I AM GETTING A GOAT !!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Kidhenduckohmy, Oct 8, 2015.

  1. Kidhenduckohmy

    Kidhenduckohmy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have not really thought much about the worming schedule yet. I guess I was thinking it would be like horses? I will find out what she is doing.

    My friend will be trimming the goats feet before I get her and said that I should trim about two months later. I have been looking at hoof shears and will have them before the goat is here.

    One thing I have been trying to figure out is fencing. Where the goat will be, is not where we plan them being later. We are going to use our old chicken coop for now. But the coop leads out to a "yard" Where the permanent pen will be there is more brush. So what wold be a good temporary fence? I was going to purchase cow panela, but they are sold out everywhere within a couple hours drive. Is there a difference between field fencing, horse fencing and sheep fencing as I have been reading different people use these different terms when talking goats. One question I can not find an asher to is how much outside space do they need? Right now I am just looking at minimal as it is not the permanent place, but I also want them to be happy enough to not try to get out.

    Oh, and does 70 bales sound abount right for December thru July?
     
  2. Tumbling K

    Tumbling K Overrun With Chickens

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    fencing!!! lol

    I used a regular field fence. Wish now I would have used goat fencing. kids and I are continually helping goats remove their bicorn heads from the fence. once they mature some, and their horns get larger, to where they don't fit thru the holes this problem will eliminate itself.

    the acreage for just a few goats would depend on the available forage and your worming schedule. make sure to never feed them directly on the ground, and to always clean their feed trough or bucket.
     
  3. chiques chicks

    chiques chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    I'm in the same boat. Two young wethers coming in a month and a half. In building their yard with cattle panel lined with 5 for welded wire with electric fence inside, outside and on top.

    That should solve almost everything!

    From what I've read, goats need very little grain except when pregnant or nursing, but I don't currently have goats and never have.
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    We use a 2x4 inch welded wire fencing, 3 or 4 feet high with a single electric strand about half way up, it keeps them from climbing and rubbing on the fence, we also have some wooden fencing as well, yes beware of fencing like cattle panels as goats get their heads stuck in them especially if they have their horns.

    I worm as necessary for each goat, over worming builds resistance to wormers.

    I have kept goats on a dry lot and on pasture, they actually seem to have less problems with worms on a dry lot, and goats really just like waiting around to be served their food, they aren't thrilled at having to go out and get their own.

    And 70 bales should be enough for a single goat, be aware that goats do not eat the stem part of the hay and create a lot of waste.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2015
  5. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    For this reason make sure you ration the hay to them and force them to actually eat it and not pick through it or else it will just become bedding...

    I watch the waste under my hay feeders and adjust the daily ration to what they are eating to reduce waste...

    As for worming I worm twice a year once in about April/May and again in October/November...
     
  6. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Has nobody mentioned that you will need two goats? You should not just have a single goat? Goat 101: they are herd animals. They need another goats a companion. Considering she is now living with other goats, she will be absolutely miserable being kept alone. I cannot believe the breeder would even sell a goat to be a single, it is quite irresponsible. And even if she is bred, that is a five month wait until she produces kids to keep her company. The stress of being kept alone might even cause her to abort her pregnancy.
     
  7. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    she said she was keeping another goat with it.
     
  8. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    Yes, I mentioned it in my initial post and the OP confirmed they would not be alone in the next follow up... Post number 2 and 3 of this thread...
     
  9. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    I guess I got used to too many people who truly do only want to keep a single goat here. Your initial post staying "A goat" threw me off. At least you are doing things properly, which is a refreshing change, unlike so many people here.
     
  10. Kidhenduckohmy

    Kidhenduckohmy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    sorry, I guess my first post was misleading. But I put "a goat" because technically I am only getting one....and borrowing another. Next summer is when I plan to but one.
     

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