I had no idea 2 months ago that I would be a member of a chicken blog! Im not even on Facebook!

RedBawk

In the Brooder
Jun 2, 2020
1
16
18
I have dogs, cats and horses. I never really wanted chickens , because I was afraid that I could not protect them from my animals and other wild animals in the area! I took these chickens (1 rooster and 1 hen) because a lady that had them lost her house. She was driving around with them in her car! I told her to Bring them to me! I know almost nothing about chickens, but it didn't take long for me to star enjoying them. I am starting at the very little to know nothing stage. I need to build a chicken tractor, I need to learn about the dusting box, parasites and on! I look forward to reading your posts, seeing your pictures and hearing what you have to say! Thank you, RedBawk
 

SE WA Guy

Chirping
May 14, 2020
67
121
63
Welcome!

It is a lot to learn lol - but in the end, it's only as complicated as you make it. We all built coops and runs and have vitamin protocols and feeding standards and and and....you get the point. But really, chickens are hardy little devils, and my personal opinion is that they have a great easy learning curve. You will have wiggle room for mistakes, so don't be hard on yourself starting out. Some people build practical poultry mansions for them, and I personally know a guy that has chickens living in his junk yard all year round. They find their own shelter there and he really only puts feed out for them in the winter. But most of us here seem to fall somewhere in between those two extremes.

Your major advantage is that you're starting with full grown chickens, so they've already made it through the touch and go phase of their infancy. If you've already got pets, you probably have a crate or a portable kennel lying around somewhere that the birds can use at night to keep them safe. And it sounds like you can range them in your yard until you get something more permanent.

But be careful, the "chicken bug" is about to bite you. You'll find you start watching the birds instead of TV. You'll learn their favorite treats and go out of your way to make sure you have some on hand. It's a vicious cycle.

And pretty soon you'll get to play the favorite BYC game, 'Roo or Pullet'. Now I'm horrible at this game, but it's fun to play. Hope to see you around the forums for some time to come.

And pics of your new birds are always appreciated.
 

Entreparadis

Chirping
Aug 8, 2019
72
96
76
Hi! It was very nice of you to help that poor lady out, and it will be tons of fun to take care of your new chicken charges. I'm sure you realize that the rooster may be loud and are willing to hear his calls, and that they will breed and hatch out eggs if you allow them to. Since it is so hot and muggy this time of year, giving them a dust box with very fine/dry dirt and some diotomaceous earth will help prevent bug bites and skin infections. If you collect eggs to eat, they may start to incubate if it is hot enough outside or if the hen is broody. That's one surprise we all want to avoid. Also note that when you have your tractor, any vegetation on the ground will be eaten or scratched and the ground will end up bare if they stay in the same area for long.
 

featherhead007

Addict
Premium Feather Member
Feb 2, 2017
18,034
112,604
1,427
San Joaquin Valley CA.
Welcome!

It is a lot to learn lol - but in the end, it's only as complicated as you make it. We all built coops and runs and have vitamin protocols and feeding standards and and and....you get the point. But really, chickens are hardy little devils, and my personal opinion is that they have a great easy learning curve. You will have wiggle room for mistakes, so don't be hard on yourself starting out. Some people build practical poultry mansions for them, and I personally know a guy that has chickens living in his junk yard all year round. They find their own shelter there and he really only puts feed out for them in the winter. But most of us here seem to fall somewhere in between those two extremes.

Your major advantage is that you're starting with full grown chickens, so they've already made it through the touch and go phase of their infancy. If you've already got pets, you probably have a crate or a portable kennel lying around somewhere that the birds can use at night to keep them safe. And it sounds like you can range them in your yard until you get something more permanent.

But be careful, the "chicken bug" is about to bite you. You'll find you start watching the birds instead of TV. You'll learn their favorite treats and go out of your way to make sure you have some on hand. It's a vicious cycle.

And pretty soon you'll get to play the favorite BYC game, 'Roo or Pullet'. Now I'm horrible at this game, but it's fun to play. Hope to see you around the forums for some time to come.

And pics of your new birds are always appreciated.
:goodpost:You qualify! Welcome.
 

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