I know they can tolerate the cold but.....

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by fowlmood, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. fowlmood

    fowlmood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 28, 2009
    northern Michigan
    I finally had to physically move my pair inside. Because they are so used to roosting outside and did so in the snow and cold, apparently they got disoriented or something when the snow really piled up. They acted like they didn't want to get their feet in the snow. They just stayed up on their roost. After two solid days of sitting outside day and night without coming in to eat or drink, I gave in and moved them inside myself. I kept thinking they would come to their senses and move in. The inside coop area may not be much warmer, but it is at least out of the wind. I was getting concerned when they wouldn't come in to eat. They seemed a little grumpy with the idea of me moving them in and blocking off the door to the outside run at first. Now they seem to have figured out it's better inside with the food and water. I figure, just because they can tolerate the cold, doesn't mean they have to stay out and starve to death to prove it. Will peafowl typically stay out and not eat or drink for a few days? I make sure all of my animals can get to food and water at all times, especially during the winter. These two just didn't seem to have the smarts to take advantage of that.
     
  2. featherhead

    featherhead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 1, 2008
    Kentucky, USA
    <G> It's always taken about 3 years for my peas to figure this out. From age 3 and older, they will all head to their barns when it rains, snows or gets windy. The younger two hens still don't get it. I physically move them into the barns. The past couple of nights have been in the high teens, so I herded the charcoal girls into the barn to be with the others. Then I locked the trap-door for the night.

    Peas can take the cold, but the wind can kill them. I always keep an eye out for the Spalding and White because they are more susceptible to the elements. Our blue male is around 15 and probably spent all his time outside before he came here 7 years ago. He's missing toenails on two toes - probably from frostbite. He shouldn't have to worry about that any more. He truly appreciates the security of the barn, and is the first one to head in during bad weather.

    Like your birds, mine would just hunch on their perches, oblivious to the comfy barn with lots of straw. They seemed afraid of the snow because they couldn't tell how deep it was.
     
  3. fowlmood

    fowlmood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 28, 2009
    northern Michigan
    I just thought my white female was living up to her name--princess. She acted like she didn't want to get her feet wet in the snow. It makes sense that they couldn't tell how deep it was. They are both happy and healthy inside now. Any ideas for boredom busters while the peas are locked inside?
     
  4. featherhead

    featherhead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kentucky, USA
    Boredom buster.... hmmmm.....
    How about releasing a couple dozen crickets in the barn? Or would that be considered animal cruelty (to the birds)?
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2009
  5. the Old Rebel

    the Old Rebel Rest in Peace -2011

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    May 12, 2007
    Hendersonville NC
    Mine won't put their feet in the snow either. We had one trapped in a tree last night in the worst snowstorm we've had in these parts in quite awhile. She WOULD NOT come down. We were finally able to catch her this morning and put her in the pen with her family. They are all on the roost. Even though half their pen is covered, so there isn't snow in that part, they still won't come down.... not even for food and water.

    As for boredom busters..... I could be sooooo wrong. But I think birds and animals are a lot more accepting of their situations than humans are. They don't seem to mind just being still..... and keeping their feet warm while they roost. Perhaps they are pondering the deep questions of Life. Perhaps we should take our cue from them???
     

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