I need a tall tale about why the cockerel had to go...

BecsRitchie

In the Brooder
May 15, 2016
25
6
42
Hello,

I have a little problem and was hoping for any ideas. Last year a Silkie hen I bought turned out to be a cockerel. My kids 8 and 6 years have become pretty fond of him. It's not the first time it's happened and my breeder is always happy to take cockerels, the problem is the idea of sending him back brings my son to tears. For this reason we have kept him, however lately he has been waking my husband up at 4am, this is a problem as he already gets up at 5am so really needs a good night sleep. He's now had about 4 weeks of disturbed nights and is looking run down. He wouldn't demand I get rid of the cockerel but I really think I should put his health first. So here's the thing, what do I say to the kids? If I say I am getting rid of him because Daddy can't sleep, they'll think we are mean, I also don't want my husband to take the blame, he only sees them at weekends. Hard to blame it on a fox as they live in a very fox proof enclosure. I have previously told them a Poland needed to be looked after by the breeder as she was unwell (needed to be put down). I was thinking I could say I have lent him to a Silkie breeder for a while but this isn't permanent enough. Aghh,, I know there are worse problems in life but if anyone has some imaginative/ creative suggestions, I would be very interested to hear them

Becs
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
99,051
138,198
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
How about the truth?
Roosters can be disruptively noisy and must be relocated,
lie a little and tell them he's keeping you awake to spare hubby the blame.


I was told a fib about a pet relocation when about that age, it didn't lessen my grief/distress and I was ticked and forever mistrustful of parents when I found out the truth not too long later.
 

BecsRitchie

In the Brooder
May 15, 2016
25
6
42
Mmm, I think you're right. They'll feel the loss whatever I say. I guess I'll just have to break it to them. It's part of keeping chickens and it probably won't be the last time we have to give up a Roo.
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
11 Years
Mar 15, 2010
15,873
33,103
1,092
On the MN prairie.
Mmm, I think you're right. They'll feel the loss whatever I say. I guess I'll just have to break it to them. It's part of keeping chickens and it probably won't be the last time we have to give up a Roo.


Kids really are resiliant. You are the parent, so you get to make the decisions. Your kids might cry, and then they will get over it and move on. I think your last sentence is perfect. You need to tell them that. One thing that will help them accept it is how you deal with it. If you approach it matter of factly, they will learn to do so, too. They will still feel the loss, but will be able to handle it a better. I would say something along the lines of, "Honey, the rooster needs to go to a new home. He's crowing way too early in the morning and disturbing people. We need to think of others. " (This may not work if you don't have neighbors close enough to be bothered by it. Then you'll have to find another way to be vague yet honest.)

I think you're doing the right thing in protecting your husband's health.
 

greenfeathers

Chirping
Feb 17, 2016
194
22
51
People's Republic of MD
I went through a somewhat similar thing with my 5 year old daughter. We bought 25 straight run chicks. Knowing full well many would be boys and what that meant. I was fine with it. I explained to her the first day that some of them would be food. When the day came she not only wanted to watch but got mad when I wouldn't give her the knife to help. It didn't bother her at all. In fact she threatens the two remaining boys that if they don't behave she'll eat them.

If the breeder takes them back that's all the better than freezer camp. But either way I'd just tell the kids.
 

lazy gardener

Crossing the Road
7 Years
Nov 7, 2012
27,615
27,065
917
CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
Welcome to BYC, Becs. Kids are far more resilient than we think they are. My 9 y.o. GD wants to make pets of the chickens, though she rarely gets to handle them, even as chicks. She understands that roos go to the freezer, and wants to be around for the processing day. Just a thought: to allow a child to put their fondness of an animal before the physical needs of your husband, or yourself for that matter is turning the world upside down. Children need to understand that human needs must come first.
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
11 Years
Mar 15, 2010
15,873
33,103
1,092
On the MN prairie.
Welcome to BYC, Becs. Kids are far more resilient than we think they are. My 9 y.o. GD wants to make pets of the chickens, though she rarely gets to handle them, even as chicks. She understands that roos go to the freezer, and wants to be around for the processing day. Just a thought: to allow a child to put their fondness of an animal before the physical needs of your husband, or yourself for that matter is turning the world upside down. Children need to understand that human needs must come first.
^^^ This.
 

MANNA-PRO

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