Increasing egg size

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by raacampbell, Jun 9, 2010.

  1. raacampbell

    raacampbell Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 15, 2009
    Long Island NY
    Hi,

    I have a question about how egg size increases as the chicken ages. In order to get larger eggs is it enough for the chicken to become older or is it also important for the bird to have a break from laying and then re-start.

    Rob
     
  2. gallusdomesticus

    gallusdomesticus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 14, 2008
    Lynn Haven, FL
    A hen's egg size is genetically determined. If she is subject to temperatures too high, or does not have adequate salt or fat in her diet, egg size will decrease but there is nothing you can do to increase egg size over what she is genetically programmed to produce. Here's a good article on egg laying:

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/ps/ps02900.pdf
     
  3. feathersnuggles

    feathersnuggles Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 4, 2009
    Seattle
    Generally, the quality of the egg is improved after a hen has molted - especially the first big molt. And they often, but not always, stop laying during a molt, as the oviduct can use some downtime to undergo the conditioning it needs for egg color and size improvement. At the same time, the hen drops her body feathers and regrows all new ones. Molts are hard on them. It's nice to feed them extra protein during that time, so they can more easy go through it.
     
  4. newchicksnducks

    newchicksnducks Chillin' With My Peeps

    All pullets tend to lay smaller eggs. As they mature, they will start laying what their breed size determines. Example - A young Jersey Giant may lay small or medium eggs, but by the time she is mature, her eggs will usually be extra large.
     
  5. raacampbell

    raacampbell Out Of The Brooder

    72
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    39
    Jul 15, 2009
    Long Island NY
    @newchicksnducks

    Thanks but my question was whether age alone is sufficient or is it necessary for them to "switch off" over the winter?
     

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