Increasing flock, question about roosts

tdan

In the Brooder
Dec 31, 2019
69
47
42
Coastal South Carolina
So I would like say it may cause issues.

I have 36 birds varying in age and breed. I have a 4' by 18' coop that every single bird roosts in despite other coops. There are two roosting bars even in height the full length. There is a 2' open door with 2' closed on the right 10' on the left. They established min girls om the short front, then downward to the left. rooster roosts looking out the door. Never once seen a squabble expect when I added some 1 year old hens that ended up at the top.

Majority of my birds are young and my rooster guards and shuts down any arguments fast. Your results may vary, but my girls wont roost elsewhere now.

Good advice above.
The only comments I’ll add are the fact that a 4’ wide coop will create an issue you aren’t aware of yet...pecking order and submission/respect to those higher. A lower pecking order chicken needs to give a higher chicken the space they demand! So, they need to be able to avoid that higher pecking order bird with more space than 4’ would allow. If higher pecking order bird is in the middle of that 4’ width space, then the higher chicken is able to harass or reprimand the lower chicken very easily...the lower one can’t properly respect the other one’s space. So, even if you gave more space in the form of length, you could potentially have problems with the width. Certainly depends on temperaments, too.

Roost height: we have some large BJG, it is a good thing we have a ladder roost system, with the lowest roost about 12” above the ground. They do roost high, but step down the ladder to get off the lower roost. The others will fly down or jump down, but the heavy breeds do need some way to get closer to the ground before getting off.

it is exciting to plan for a new/improved coop, so keep going with the planning!
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
10 Years
Nov 12, 2009
7,378
7,257
536
western South Dakota
As the OP also referred to cost, instead of sticking to the idea of 12 birds. It might be best to look around. Often times on various social media posts - sheds are sold for considerable less than building from scratch, and a lick of paint can make them quite respectable.

Then measure, indicate the door, and I bet we can come up with creative ways to get a good flock into it. Might be 8, might be 10, might be 14.... my point is, the happiest of flocks is the best flock to be around, exact measurements don't alway have to be met exactly.... and sometimes it is a starting point that is messing up the whole idea, the idea of 12 birds.

Often times filling a coop to the max is not a good idea either, (says the lady who is planning right now on doing exactly that) but it is better to have a multi-generational flock, whereas birds are added and lost from the flock each year.

Mrs K
 

Acre4Me

Free Ranging
Nov 12, 2017
3,389
7,233
517
Western Ohio
So I would like say it may cause issues.

I have 36 birds varying in age and breed. I have a 4' by 18' coop that every single bird roosts in despite other coops. There are two roosting bars even in height the full length. There is a 2' open door with 2' closed on the right 10' on the left. They established min girls om the short front, then downward to the left. rooster roosts looking out the door. Never once seen a squabble expect when I added some 1 year old hens that ended up at the top.

Majority of my birds are young and my rooster guards and shuts down any arguments fast. Your results may vary, but my girls wont roost elsewhere now.
As I mentioned, depends on temperament of the birds. In addition, you live in a decidedly warmer area than OP, very low probability of the same winter weather for long periods of time.
 

tdan

In the Brooder
Dec 31, 2019
69
47
42
Coastal South Carolina
You say depending, but after saying it will.

Are you of the opinion it will or may? I am of the opinion based on experience other than just where I live, that it could function fine. Just sharing my opinions and quoting you to gain clarification.

As I mentioned, depends on temperament of the birds. In addition, you live in a decidedly warmer area than OP, very low probability of the same winter weather for long periods of time.
 

Acre4Me

Free Ranging
Nov 12, 2017
3,389
7,233
517
Western Ohio
You say depending, but after saying it will.

Are you of the opinion it will or may? I am of the opinion based on experience other than just where I live, that it could function fine. Just sharing my opinions and quoting you to gain clarification.
So, I see you are unwilling to acknowledge that a very cold, windy, snowy winter environment IS different than a warm coastal environment. The OP is asking for thoughts on their particular set-up, rather than on semantics. Personally, I think that OP is capable of deciding whether their space constraints WILL or MAY cause a problem.
 

Folly's place

Crossing the Road
8 Years
Sep 13, 2011
17,516
22,830
906
southern Michigan
It's about weather, but only in part. Predator issues happen everywhere, and being locked in for two or three weeks is a common situation, while waiting for a raptor to move on, or while eliminating a ground predator.
Until it's happened, most people don't think about these situations.
Mary
 

tdan

In the Brooder
Dec 31, 2019
69
47
42
Coastal South Carolina
EDIT Obviously I am not smart enough to distinguish weather. I appreciate your kind judgment. Have a good one.

So, I see you are unwilling to acknowledge that a very cold, windy, snowy winter environment IS different than a warm coastal environment. The OP is asking for thoughts on their particular set-up, rather than on semantics. Personally, I think that OP is capable of deciding whether their space constraints WILL or MAY cause a problem.
 
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