Incubating Guinea Eggs

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by tinybarnfarm, Mar 23, 2012.

  1. tinybarnfarm

    tinybarnfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 14, 2011
    I have never incubated guinea eggs(or any eggs) before but would like to this year. One of the hens has started laying so I have been getting about one egg a day. I just have a few guineas so I won't be getting lots of eggs at one time. Here is what I plan to do, any advice or opinions very welcome! I purchased an LG incubator and turner and am thinking of getting another (without turner). I know I won't be getting lots of eggs so I don't want to wait more than a week or two collecting enough to fill the thing. Does anybody see anything wrong with say adding 7 or so eggs to the incubator (with turner) at a time then moving them to the other incubator for the last 3 days to hatch? Also how clean do you get the eggs before putting in the incubator? My guineas like to get them nice and dirty. I'm also still on the fence about trying to add a fan to the incubator before the 1st hatch. I plugged it in and ran it a few days and it keeps temp pretty consistent. Thanks
     
  2. sparkles2307

    sparkles2307 Terd of Hurtles

    It could work, sounds like moving eggs to a hatcher right before hatching.

    Don't wach the eggs, just brush off as much as you can, and be aware that dirty eggs have less chance of hatching due to bacteria, so if you can somehow give them move bedding to keep the eggs clean from the get-go it'd be better.
     
  3. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2011
    Big Oak Valley, CA
    I use a separate hatcher for all my hatching, and I just keep filling the incubators back up with fresh batches of eggs whenever I move eggs over to the hatcher (once a week is my setting/hatching schedule this year, last year it was every 4 days). The only issues I have with this is that eventually you'll need to disinfect the incubator, because it's generally running longer than the normal 28 day cycle and bacteria can build up inside and on the turner. So usually every 28 days or so I'll take all the eggs out, put them in paper egg cartons, wrap the cartons in warm towels out of the dryer and then rush to disinfect and clean the incubator and turner.

    I try to only set clean eggs, but if I really have to set some dirty eggs I'll usually just lightly scrub the dirty spots off with a dry paper towel, trying not to spread the yuck around on the rest of the egg. I typically try not to set dirty eggs tho and I'll usually just cook those for my dogs or my Peafowl. But since you don't have many eggs to work with, in my experience as far as really dirty eggs go... it's better to rinse them (the dirty ones only, not all the eggs) under HOT running water (as hot as you can stand your hands in) as quickly as you can (just a few seconds), gently rubbing the dirty spots off under the running water, (try not to grind the dirt into the pores if possible) and then quickly blot them dry with a paper towel. I'm not a fan of washing eggs, because it can force bacteria in thru the pores of the shell and cause blood rings or embryo death at one point or another during incubation... but IMO it's better to lose a washed egg or 2 rather than a whole incubator full of eggs because you put dirty/poopy bacteria covered eggs in the incubator with a batch of developing eggs. Incubators provide perfect conditions for bacteria growth and the bacteria are easily spread thru interior of the incubator, onto the turner and into the other eggs.

    Good luck, hope you hatch some keets!
     
  4. tinybarnfarm

    tinybarnfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 14, 2011
    Thanks, I thought that might be the case on washing them before incubating. I should have enough Sunday to start my first batch so i'm pretty excited! I have been collecting eggs and keeping them at room temp, but is there an "ideal" room temp? I read to do that with chicken eggs but have never seen a temp specified for guineas. I have been putting clean bedding in and it has helped but they still like to throw it everywhere then lay an egg on a bare spot of ground. I also added an igloo dog house to the coop/enclosure to give them a dark spot to lay and for the one guinea that uses it the eggs are pretty clean. Only 2 guineas are laying at this point so hopefully the others will like the dog house when they start.
     
  5. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2011
    Big Oak Valley, CA
    I usually store my eggs in my cool unheated spare bedroom, out of direct sunlight. I put them in cardboard egg cartons and then elevate one end up on a couple books, and alternate ends at least once a day. Optimal storage temp is 55-60 degrees. Room temp may allow some development to start and then die off. I do bring my eggs to room temp before setting them in the incubator tho.

    My Hens often share a nesting spot. I use a few old marked eggs, or some med size brown chicken eggs to salt the nest to keep them laying there. Eventually a Hen will try to go broody on the marked eggs (usually after she's laid about 24-28 eggs, even tho I'm collecting them daily) and I have to break up the nest, take away the marked eggs for a few days and move things around...

    Good luck, keep us updated!
     

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