INDIANA BYC'ers HERE!

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by jchny2000, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. kabhyper1

    kabhyper1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    The deviled eggs were a hit! Even though they were tiny. lol
     
  2. animallover2202

    animallover2202 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,020
    21
    133
    Aug 25, 2012
    Buck Creek IN
    now i want deviled eggs lol
     
  3. pbirdhaven

    pbirdhaven Chillin' With My Peeps

    804
    139
    191
    Aug 26, 2008
    North Vernon IN
    You can get the spray from Orschelns or a poultry supply house. It's expensive but lasts a long time. I paid about $60 for the large size about 2 years ago and still have probably half of it left. There's a smaller size available now that wasn't then.

    I spray about 1/2 inch into a bathroom cup and pull it up into a syringe (no needle), then apply about 1/2 cc on a bantam at the base of the skull, under the wings, and near the vent--that's 1/2 cc total, not each place. For a large bird, between 3/4 and 1 cc, depending upon size. You have to be sure that you're getting it on the skin and not just on the feathers; it works internally to kill the bug when it bites. It's waterproof once it dries, just like on a dog. Dusting gets current varmints, while the Frontline takes care of future hatches and any that escaped the dust.

    You can also apply it with a Q-tip, but it's harder to control amount that way. Some folks spray it by getting the nozzle right up to the skin, but again, it's harder to control amounts. Those who have been doing it a while know just how much to spray--I'm not that coordinated.

    I'm wary of dusting crests on my Polish and silkies; this way I know nothing is getting into their eyes and those pesky crest mites are controlled (mostly!). Still have to wash those crests periodically, though.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  4. Old Salt 1945

    Old Salt 1945 Chillin' With My Peeps

    704
    223
    132
    May 13, 2013
    Lebanon, IN
    You all may find this kind of icky, but.............

    Neither I nor my wife like the neck, back, or internal parts, so I kept the legs, wings, and breast.

    I tossed the rest in a bucket and, when I had finished, I dumped it all in the scalding bucket and cooked it for an hour or so. Cooled it all with running water from the garden hose and then iced it all down in a styrafoam ice chest and put it in the refrigerator.

    Morning and evening, I throw one out into the chicken yard. When they get done, there is nothing left but clean, dry bones. Rotten dog Millie makes short work with that.

    Free high protein feed. Chickens are omnivores. Insert cannibal joke here.

    I cook it so the chickens don't get the idea of eating their coop-mates.

    John
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2013
  5. vickichicki

    vickichicki Chillin' With My Peeps

    733
    41
    123
    Sep 2, 2012
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Do you have a rooster in there with them?

    A few of my girls have spots just above their tails. I know they are the favourties with the rooster and he can be a little rough, especially if one is flavor of the week.
     
  6. pginsber

    pginsber Chillin' With My Peeps

    658
    275
    211
    Sep 20, 2012
    Indianapolis, IN
    Does anybody have a digital scale to weigh eggs that they would like to get rid of? Before I get one off of the internet, thought maybe I could help you declutter your kitchen...
     
  7. pginsber

    pginsber Chillin' With My Peeps

    658
    275
    211
    Sep 20, 2012
    Indianapolis, IN
    [​IMG]
    Wow---I'm such a fair-weather chicken raiser...I never even thought of what gets done with the innards after processing...
     
  8. Kiniska

    Kiniska Chillin' With My Peeps

    890
    123
    158
    Nov 8, 2012
    English, Indiana
    I don't like those parts either, but some of the ladies I work with think they are delicacies. So those bits get saved and go to them. One of the gals will even come fetch my extra roos when my freezer is full and I do not want to feed them any more. The chickens get all our dinner left overs though.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2013
  9. Old Salt 1945

    Old Salt 1945 Chillin' With My Peeps

    704
    223
    132
    May 13, 2013
    Lebanon, IN
    I use pesticides with abandon and usually have no fear of them.

    That said, Frontline is a systemic insecticide. That means that it makes the animal, dog, cat, or bird, toxic to the bugs.

    I would not be comfortable putting this stuff on laying hens. Eggs toxic to bugs would cause me some (minor} concern.

    Frontline has caused my dog no harm that I can see, so I wouldn't be real, real concerned about it, but I'm not sure I would want it in my eggs. On the other hand, if there was a heavy infestation that couldn't be cured any other way, I wouldn't throw away the eggs.

    Wouldn't sell them, though.

    John
     
  10. Old Salt 1945

    Old Salt 1945 Chillin' With My Peeps

    704
    223
    132
    May 13, 2013
    Lebanon, IN
    I bought this one a couple of years ago. You can weigh a gnat's eyelash with it. It goes up to 300 grams. A chicken egg weighs around 60 grams, so it will handle the largest turkey egg. You can put a sponge on it and zero it, then put the egg on the sponge so it won't roll around. One of the best 10 bucks I've spent.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/300g-x-0-01...=US_Pocket_Digital_Scales&hash=item56464dfe26

    [​IMG]

    John
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by