Infected leg causing breast blister?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Whimsical Farming Wife, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. Whimsical Farming Wife

    Whimsical Farming Wife Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 21, 2009
    After paying little attention to my flock over the past few months- I have discovered that one of my hens has a NASTY infection on her leg. When I say nasty... I mean it is swollen, red, smelly, brown & icky!!!

    Question: I discovered a blister on her breast as well. I think this could be caused by her leaning on the roost awkwardly due to the bad leg?

    I don't know what the cause of infection is. I have had a long recurring issue with scaly leg mites- thought it was looking good over the summer months.
    Some of my birds seem to have swollen feet. I am reading about bumblefoot, gout, etc.

    I have soaked the infected foot in warm epsom salt water, and coated with an ointment.
    Tomorrow I am cleaning the coop, and will do another foot treatment... we'll go from there.
     
  2. fried green eggs

    fried green eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 25, 2011
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    I think this hen should be given a antibiotic to help her fight this infection. I know what drug I would use but, I'm not a vet so, I don't want to give you the wrong advice. I hope someone else can help. Hoping your hen recovers soon and things go well with your other hens.
     
  3. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Won't be the farm on it, as this is based solely upon what you've said, and statistical probabilities. But, I'll bet at least one of my less favorite guineas that she's got a staph infection.

    Staphylococcus (Staph)
    Bacteria – common in the environment and normal inhabitant of skin and mucus membranes of
    mouth and eyes.
    Symptoms: Lameness, swollen joints and footpads.
    Transmission: for infection to occur, a breakdown in natural defense mechanisms of bird
    (damage to skin or mucus membrane from trauma or another disease -- viruses).
    Prevention/Control: good sanitation, use quality litter; cull affected birds, if problem still
    increasing then use appropriate antibiotics.

    Despite the suggestion to cull affected birds, I would possibly quarantine, and definitely treat. Disinfection of the roosts/boxes/etc. would be your best defense against spreading it to others.

    There's an *enormous* thread by beekissed, the road less traveled ... she was preparing to cull a severely infected bird, named 'middle sister' I think, and decided to treat instead. Successfully. I located a point where it's being discussed, but you may have to wade through many pages to find where she reports in detail what she did.

    Also, the list of links in my signature would be worthy of bookmarking (each opens in a new window ~'-)
     
  4. Whimsical Farming Wife

    Whimsical Farming Wife Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 21, 2009
    In our area, we can take one batch of birds per year for necropsy at the local animal health centre for $10- and they give an extensive report. This girl is going to be my bird for the year. I would like to get to the bottom of the cause if possible, in order to effectively deal with the rest of the flock.

    Thanx for your input [​IMG]
     
  5. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Most probably the wisest course. Culling protects the flock, and necropsy provides many details that can help improve the health of all, beyond idetification of the infection(s).
     

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