Infectious Coryza in my flock... now what?

Cluck Wild Farm

Chirping
6 Years
Apr 24, 2013
106
20
91
Southern Illinois
So I brought six new hens into my healthy flock.... obviously, a massive mistake. Today (four days later), I found my favorite hen with her face so swollen that she can't open her eyes, ocular and nasal discharge, and wheezing. Took her to the vet, and the vet confirmed exactly what I didn't want to hear - she has infectious coryza. The vet told me to get Duramycin-10 and administer it through her water, and to be safe, treat the whole flock as well since they've all been exposed. Okay, done. Now my question - do ALL chickens faces swell so much that they can't see when they have this? She's in my bathroom, and I'm having to use a syringe every hour to get liquid (and antibiotics) into her because she can't even see to walk, eat, or drink. And if she could see, I'm not sure that she would want to... I know she feels just awful. I can't do this with all thirty-five of my hens. I've never had to deal with this before so I'm just curious how bad it gets, I guess. Will most of them be able to see to get to their water? I'm planning on treating them, then maintaining a closed flock for the next couple of years, eventually culling, and starting fresh. Any input, or advice would be much appreciated :'(
 

Eggcessive

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I know you probably feel awful, but Dawg is right--culling the sick birds would be best. If I were you, I would either cull all 6, or take them back to the woman, if you can find her. Maybe offer to buy more to meet you, then hand them back over, and don't ask for money back. I saw where you already started one on sulfadimethoxine and now are using Duramycin. The Albon or sulfa will also treat coryza. You also were treating lice, and sevin dust treats that well. What you are going through is common in posts here on BYC, and it is quite a learning experience. If you can't return them or cull them yourself, perhaps a hunter friend or outdoorsman would take care of them for you. Then you can clean and disinfect everything. So sorry that you are dealing with this.
 

Cluck Wild Farm

Chirping
6 Years
Apr 24, 2013
106
20
91
Southern Illinois
They've all (save for the one I got with lice) been in the same coop for the last four days... sans the presentation of symptoms yet, wouldn't they all be infected at this point? They share the same water, food, and snuggle together at night. We have a second hen showing symptoms now - while the original carrier culprits still look 'perfectly fine'. Also, we have a nursery pen attached to the big coop, separated only by chicken wire. We have fifteen little ones in there that are around a month old. I hate to sound like a blubbering fool, but I've cried so many times today at the thought of what I've done and how STUPID it was for me to add six hens from someone I don't know. On one hand, it makes perfect sense to cull every last one of them to be safe, but on the other, they're my babies and killing them all without at least attempting to save them breaks my heart.
 

Eggcessive

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Coryza is about the worst of some of the respiratory diseases, at least worse than MG or bronchitis, not that those are fun to have. I guess you will have your work cut out for you treating sick birds, butI would get rid of the new ones now, and maybe cull your sickest birds. At least separate the sick ones, and maybe some will have some immunity. Pleas post back here with your progress from time to time.
 

Cluck Wild Farm

Chirping
6 Years
Apr 24, 2013
106
20
91
Southern Illinois
I finally contacted the woman I purchased the birds from, to let her know about her herd carrying coryza in case she somehow didn't know. She's saying she treated a chicken for mycoplasma three week prior, but never coryza. Still SUPER sweet of her to sell one to me... not. She said she had the bird tested, so she's sure its mycoplasma. My vet doesn't specialize in chickens, so she diagnosed coryza based on the symptoms, without testing. Are the symptoms similar? Is one disease 'better' (less severe) than the other?
 

Eggcessive

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MG (mycoplasma/CRD) and infectious coryza can have similar symptoms--snots, eye drainage, swollen eyes or face, sneeze or cough, and chest rattles or wheezes. Coryza supposedly has has bad odor, but I haven't seen it before. The only way to tell the difference for sure is to get one tested, or if it dies, get a necropsy done by the state vet or Dept. of Agriculture. There are milder and more severe strains of all respiratory diseases, and sometimes the chicken will have 2 or more at the same time. In infectious bronchitis, frequently they can get a secondary infection of MG or coryza. Coccidiosis can also be a factor sometimes. Here is a link to contacts for your state vet, and a couple of links to read:
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_dis_spec/poultry/participants.shtml
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/pou...overview_of_infectious_coryza_in_poultry.html
http://umaine.edu/livestock/poultry/mycoplasma-gallisepticum-faq/
 

Cluck Wild Farm

Chirping
6 Years
Apr 24, 2013
106
20
91
Southern Illinois
Thank you Eggcessive, those links were very helpful. I really don't know what it is at this point, and very well may have them tested. The only thing making me lean toward Mycoplasma now is the funky smell that supposedly accompanies Coryza. The discharge they have doesn't smell at all. This is all just so awful, and overwhelming. Thank you for your responses, everyone.
 

Eggcessive

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You're welcome. You would be better off with MG, so hopefully it is that. It can pass through hatching eggs, but new chickens can be vaccinated for it.
 
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