Integrate a Lone Hen?

azygous

Enabler
12 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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Azygous didn't quarantine the hen in her article because it was in an animal rescue shelter for a week and had a thorough vet exam plus was wormed. Besides, quarantining cannot detect avian viruses unless the chicken happens to be symptomatic. I adopted another adult hen before this one, didn't quarantine because I knew the flock she came from and the person owning the flock was a good friend.

Azygous doesn't add chickens unless the source is well known and trusted.
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
12 Years
Nov 12, 2009
9,732
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western South Dakota
Truthfully, further quarantine is not going to show you anything other than the status quo of where she is at now. BUT there could be something that is not evident, and won't show up until mixed with yours.

My suggestion is pick a canary, a middle of the flock bird, and isolate the two of them togethers and see if any disease breaks out. Then do the no touch with the pair of them, then introduce the pair to the flock.

No one wants to re-paid for a good deed, by loosing a flock.

Mrs K
 

Aunt Angus

Crossing the Road
Jul 16, 2018
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@azygous

I realize you had integrated a hen that had been thoroughly vetted (for want of a better term). I would never expect otherwise! Would this one be less "suspect" being she's been in a shelter for a month? I'm fine waiting, but I'd like to get her integrated before the weather gets too much colder.
 

azygous

Enabler
12 Years
Dec 11, 2009
25,959
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Colorado Rockies
Best you continue the quarantine for a little longer to be sure a respiratory illness isn't about to erupt. There are tests, but you pay around $100 for each one, and you aren't assured of hitting the right one. There's no one test to see what turns up, unfortunately. Typically, you see certain symptoms and match them up with a possible disease and have the lab test for that.
 

Aunt Angus

Crossing the Road
Jul 16, 2018
6,615
16,980
832
Nevada County, CA
Best you continue the quarantine for a little longer to be sure a respiratory illness isn't about to erupt. There are tests, but you pay around $100 for each one, and you aren't assured of hitting the right one. There's no one test to see what turns up, unfortunately. Typically, you see certain symptoms and match them up with a possible disease and have the lab test for that.
I can do that. I'll probably call my vet, anyway, to see what he thinks of her.

Thanks for the info. And I never meant any disrespect. I hope you didn't take offense, and if you did I'm sorry.
 

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