Integrating chickens from different flocks

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by logansmommy7, May 15, 2009.

  1. logansmommy7

    logansmommy7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2009
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    How do you do this successfully? I will be getting some laying hens from a few different places, will they get along? How about younger chickens? (not baby but not laying)
     
  2. gkeesling

    gkeesling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i've just started and introduced hens to each other on two separate occasions. Both times there was lots of pecking and squawking for a couple days then the pecking order was established and all was quiet again. What I have learned is that you don't want to do this on a regular basis. If you are going to get a number of new hens, I'd suggest throwing them all together at one time rather than a few here and there. I've heard of hens gettting pecked to death during this time, but it hasn't been my experience.
     
  3. thetinleys

    thetinleys Out Of The Brooder

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    May 11, 2009
    I have the little ward off the main coup where they can see each other. I give it a couple of weeks if they are smaller than what is in the coup and then throw them in. there is a whole peck fest before they all calm down, but they get over it. [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  4. aeg1001

    aeg1001 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We recently got a laying hen and mixed her in with the others, like yours not chicks but not laying, and there were several deaths. It was more than pecking order, i think she is just a grump. I hope it goes better for you then it did for me. Several people have told me that it is best to mix them in the morning. GOOD LUCK [​IMG]
     
  5. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Quarantine them first, for 2 weeks, to watch for signs of disease.
    If that passes okay, then put the newcomers into the coop at night, quietly, when everyone is asleep.

    Make a big ruckus the next morning, bringing the first feeding of yummy mash and feed. They will get all worked up over eating this feast, and forget to fight with each other. Most of the integration scrambling will pass quickly this way, sometimes unoticed by even themselves.

    Thrusting them together in broad daylight - so you can watch - is usually the cause of most problems.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2009
  6. chickeneer

    chickeneer Out Of The Brooder

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    Hello,

    I am NOT an expert but I recently introduced a couple of 5 week old pullets with my 7 month old hen after she was left alone and lonely. (Most of my flock had to be given away and of the last remaining chickens, one turned out to be a rooster!) Anyway, I put the young chickens in a small enclosure (I had previously used it as a brooder-very small) facing my small coop. The chickens could see each other but not interact. At night, I put the 2 young ones in a pet carrier and set it in inside the coop with my mature hen. I continued this for about a week. Then, I threw down a lot of scratch and released the 3 chickens together into the yard. Since it seemed to go okay, that night (after dark), I put the little ones into the coop after Spraying all 3 with the same perfume! My 3 chickens are now coexisting peacefully. I don't know if I did everything right, but it seems to be working out. Good luck to you!
     
  7. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Quote:The perfume trick is an interesting wrinkle!
     
  8. 4everfarmgirl

    4everfarmgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    May 1, 2009
    Ontario
    Quote:This was very helpful. Thanks!
     
  9. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    South Georgia
    x
    oops, sorry
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2009

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