Introducing 1 docile roo to 2 hens. Input greatly appreciated!

distincthead

In the Brooder
12 Years
Apr 24, 2007
63
5
41
Central CT, USA
So my flock has dwindled and I don't have a lot of hens to go around. I have 3 roos (two Blue English Orps and some kind of sex-link). They all got along rather well until yesterday when something clicked and the top roo and the sex-link started fighting a lot. I let them be and today of course blood has been drawn from combs and the sex-link is now the dominant roo - the previously dominant roo is now outcast and gets chased to the front yard where he is all alone.

So I figure I will separate them. I also have two hens who live in a separate coop by themselves. All of these birds are within a month or two of the same age - around 1 year old. I was figuring I might just make it easier on myself by introducing one of the roos to the two hens or keeping him completely alone. I just can't decide which option is optimal.

1) Which one should I move? The sex-link isn't mean, and he gets along with the other beta-rooster. The previously dominant roo also gets along with that beta-rooster. I'm leaning towards moving the Orp outcast.

2) My gut tells me it would be best to keep him in a bachelor coop and to introduce the two hens into the main flock - it could really use the females. Will the bachelor roo care if he's alone? I think of poultry as social creatures.

I have over 30 heavy pullets coming soon for my 6'x35' coop, but of course I wont be able to introduce a roo to them until probably August, I'm thinking. Making one of these guys into soup is an option but I'd like to avoid it - they are all very sturdy, healthy birds and I'd like to keep them around since I figure 3 roos for 40+ hens is fine. I'm just frustrated with the few months I need to deal with the small flock sausage-fest politics. The coop they are all in is 6'x6' with a 6'x6' dirt floor extension, so technically 6'x12' I guess. Neither coop currently has a run but they will soon all be pent up in a 750 sq. ft. run when the pullets are mature, and perhaps let out in shifts to begin with.

Edit: the two orps seem to have no interest in the hens and don't pick at them or harass them, whereas the sex-link does the wing-down dance to a few of them and seems hyper-active around them. None of my hens have been abused by him... yet.
 
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Den in Penn

Songster
8 Years
Dec 15, 2011
3,418
212
216
SE Pa.
Either option will work. If the outcast is alone then he will be not worse off then he would if he were to be left with his original flock and harassed. You could also put two roosters in the bachelors quarters. What rooster(s) you are going to put with the new hens also has a effect on what you chose to do.
 

distincthead

In the Brooder
12 Years
Apr 24, 2007
63
5
41
Central CT, USA
Yeah that's the root of the problem; I haven't decided if I want to end up with New Hampshire & Barred Rock crosses with a huge English Orpington, or with this very stately and vigorous sex-link. It would help if I knew what breeds went to make him - I only know that he's half English Orp. Heck, I don't even know if those fat, lazy Orps WILL breed with my girls hahaha

They aren't even a year old and the roos are about 13 lbs and growing. I just think with their really wide, almost broiler like stance that I could end up with decent heavy layers that will retire nicely to the crock pot. They seem just fine being asexual, crowing and destroying my lilac bushes. :)
 
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