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Is anyone working on developing their own breed?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Jayzandra, Dec 15, 2015.

  1. Jayzandra

    Jayzandra Chillin' With My Peeps

    I've had this itch for a few years now and I think I might finally take the plunge.

    Anyone have any tips or would like to share their failures and successes?
     
  2. BBQJOE

    BBQJOE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Void where prohibited.
    Well some sick SOB somehow created the turken. I don't know. How about penning up every bird with the absolute worst traits?
    Messed up legs, scissor beaks, crossed eyes etc, let them breed, and come up with the frankenchicken?
     
  3. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    I'm currently in the process of refining my Easter Egger flock into a 'breed.' Before you start breeding, make a list of desired traits. Figure out what comb type you want, what kind of temperament you want, what color/pattern or skin color. Then, when you have a clear idea of what your 'ideal' would be, figure out which combination of breeds have at least two or more of those traits and start cross breeding. You will need to line breed to strengthen and establish each trait. Don't try to work on establishing more than two or three traits at a time. Trying to get everything you want in just a few generations isn't going to work out very well.
    For example, I love my Easter Egger rooster's coloring. I want pea combs, deep red coloring with the columbian pattern, muffs, beards, yellow skin, dark legs, and green eggs. I'll be calling them Columbian Reds, both because of the pattern/color and because of where I'm located geographically.
    The color seems to be the most difficult trait to breed consistently at this point. It will take a few more line breedings to get that straightened out.
     
  4. Jayzandra

    Jayzandra Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thank you Junebuggena, I've been researching for about 3 years now. I know exactly what I want and I know what two breeds I'm going to start with. I think I'm going to try it without the line breeding. First I'll have maybe 4 or 5 breeding flocks then I'll cross their offspring. It'll take longer but, I think it'll work.
     
  5. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Line breeding is how you establish traits and get those traits to breed true. Without line breeding, it's hit or miss and you may never achieve your desired results. At some point, you will need to cross related birds in order to achieve consistent results. Chickens have a lot more genetic diversity than mammals, so it takes many generations of very close line breeding before problems start to pop up. Line breeding one or two generations to establish a specific trait will not cause serious problems.
     

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