Is corid safe to use on week old chicks?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by sigmachigirl, Feb 16, 2014.

  1. sigmachigirl

    sigmachigirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 21, 2013
    We just lost a baby that we got from a local farm and feed store (they got them in Wednesday from a hatchery, we picked her up Thursday, and she seemed weak all day yesterday), we had tucked two under our broody Silkie behind. She is an excellent and doting mama. Not sure if the baby we lost was just not 100% after the trip, or if it was something else environmental. Anyway, we went today and got another 2 babies from a breeder I trust who keeps the babies separated. He suggested that we possibly use duramyacin just in case coccidiosis was the culprit with the last baby. We've had no trouble and no loss in the past when we've put babies from him under our broody before. If it was Coccidiosis, should I do a round of corid? Is that safe for week old chicks? I would prefer not to medicate my babies unless I have to. We are all organic and non gmo.

    Any advice is welcome. :)
     
  2. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    First, duramycin is an antibiotic, and cocci isn't a bacteria, so that will be useless. Your breeder needs a little more basic education there. Giving antibiotics "just in case" is a poor idea and has contributed to antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    I'd simply use medicated chick starter. It has amprolium, which helps the chick manage the cocci load until they build up a natural immunity to the cocci in their environment. From what you're saying, it was likely just a bummer chick, being that young, not necessarily cocci. You didn't mention bloody diarrhea, that's the hallmark of cocci in most cases.

    Use the medicated started if you're concerned about further issues or cocci, your broody momma can eat it too but I don't think you're supposed to eat eggs from hens that have eaten it--someone please correct me if that's inaccurate.
     
  3. sigmachigirl

    sigmachigirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 21, 2013
    Thank you! My thoughts too about getting a bummer chick. She was very sweet, but, always wanted to be held and warm. Our vet has had us use duramyacin for the secondary infection due to the cocci, and I think that was what the breeder was talking about. He has been doing this for a lot of years, and has a small/medium sized farm, he may have just really lucked out with healthy birds. We do not use medicated chick feed, as I have not found any that are organic, and also because our babies are also in with our normal birds, they all eat a whole grain feed, and I don't want my laying hens getting into the medicated. I think I will wait things out, and see how the second round of babies does. I will also contact our vet tomorrow for advice if things look questionable. The last babies we got from him did amazing, as have our other older girls we got from him. Our last cocci problems came last spring when we had just gotten chickens, (8-12 weeks old), and only one bird had gotten sick, but no problems at all since then. Does anyone know if there is a withdrawal period for eggs when hens are on corid? Last time I used it, my girls weren't laying yet. :)
     
  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    No, there is no withdrawal time for Corid. Corid (amprolium) is simply a thiamin blocker, preventing the coccidia from absorbing enough thiamin to survive and multiply.

    I've been doing this a lot of years too and I have never heard of secondary infection issues related to birds having coccidiosis nor of using Duramycin, or any antibiotic, in birds with coccidiosis. Coccidiosis usually kills the birds so fast that secondary bacterial infections just don't have time to show up much less require treatment. Any time you add new chicks, or any new birds, coccidiosis is a big threat so watch very carefully for it and treat asap if you even think you may see symptoms. Chicks especially are very susceptible since they have not had time to develop immunity. I treat for it immediately if I suspect it's a possibility at all because you just do not have time on your side in dealing with coccidia.
     
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