Is it true..

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by gypsyfarm123, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. gypsyfarm123

    gypsyfarm123 Out Of The Brooder

    86
    0
    41
    Jul 27, 2011
    south jersey
    Hi all:) I was out fishing once (in bare feet) where there where a lot of geese..This older gentlemen came over and told me that "there is a parasite that can enter the bottom of your feet and give you worm's". I figured he was just pulling my leg and never gave it much thought,but this morning I was out fishing (dif pond, but there was a lot of geese in the area. So,I was getting ready to leave I seen an older couple feeding the geese and decided to ask them if they ever heard of this b4 and they said that 'it WAS true'!? Sooo...Is this true? If it's true,is it the same with chickens? And finally, If it IS true with chickens,can my dog or cats catch it through their feet/paw's? Thanks<<craig
     
  2. mstrrlm

    mstrrlm Chillin' With My Peeps

    194
    2
    91
    Jun 23, 2011
    Picayune, MS
    I believe humans can get it, but pets can't due to there pads but I could be wrong
     
  3. Uzuri

    Uzuri Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 25, 2009
    They're called hook worms -- and YES dogs and cats can indeed get them. Much like fleas, they tend to specialize -- human hookworms prefer humans, dog hookworms prefer dogs, etc.

    They're one of the species that an all-purpose wormer takes care of. Can't find anything on them specifically in chickens, but if you're worming for other intestinal worms, that should take care of them.
     
  4. Ole rooster

    Ole rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,083
    30
    196
    Jun 25, 2011
    Milner, Georgia
    Is the hook worm the same as a ring worm? I was always that's how ring worms were contracted.
     
  5. ChickiKat

    ChickiKat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 10, 2011
    Eastern Kansas
    side note: ring worms are not worms, they are fungal infections.
     
  6. canesisters

    canesisters Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,341
    105
    218
    Aug 18, 2011
    Virginia
    ringworm is not a worm - it's a fungus - sort of like athlete's foot.
     
  7. ChickiKat

    ChickiKat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 10, 2011
    Eastern Kansas
    from Wikipedia:

    See the image for the biological life cycle of the hookworms where it thrives in warm earth where temperatures are over 18°C. They exist primarily in sandy or loamy soil and cannot live in clay or muck. Rainfall averages must be more than 1000 mm (40 inches) a year. Only if these conditions exist can the eggs hatch. Infective larvae of Necator americanus can survive at higher temperatures, whereas those of Ancylostoma duodenale are better adapted to cooler climates. Generally, they live for only a few weeks at most under natural conditions, and die almost immediately on exposure to direct sunlight or desiccation.

    Infection of the host is by the larvae, not the eggs. While A. duodenale can be ingested, the usual method of infection is through the skin; this is commonly caused by walking barefoot through areas contaminated with fecal matter. The larvae are able to penetrate the skin of the foot, and once inside the body, they migrate through the vascular system to the lungs, and from there up the trachea, and are swallowed. They then pass down the esophagus and enter the digestive system, finishing their journey in the intestine, where the larvae mature into adult worms
     
  8. gypsyfarm123

    gypsyfarm123 Out Of The Brooder

    86
    0
    41
    Jul 27, 2011
    south jersey
    Uuuggghhh!! Ok, I AM COMPLETELY FREAKED OUT NOW !! NO MORE BARE FOOTIN' FOR ME!!! WTH!?
     
  9. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,375
    13
    153
    Jun 4, 2011
    Central Ohio
    I think you can get something from rabbits too. Tularemia (sp?) Maybe? That's from the archives in my head, I didn't fact check, so don't swear by it
     
  10. Meara

    Meara Chillin' With My Peeps

    418
    9
    116
    Jan 23, 2011
    Midwest
    As far as I know hookworms only infect mammals. Just wanted to add some bizarre trivia - people with certain illnesses can elect to be "medically infested" with hookworms as a treatment! [​IMG]

    "Extensive research and clinical trials have demonstrated that the introduction of small doses of intestinal worms may be effective in the treatment of asthma, allergies, and some autoimmune conditions. Our company is dedicated to providing these therapies."
    http://wormtherapy.com/index.html
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by