Is there a solution for difficult egg collection in outdoor aviaries/pens?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by RedOkra, Aug 16, 2014.

  1. RedOkra

    RedOkra Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 25, 2011
    In doing my coturnix quail homework, it seems that the general consensus for housing when trying to really maximize egg production is to use battery style cages with a tilted wire bottom for egg collecting. However, I do my best to avoid the close-quarters and less natural living space that is so reminiscent of factory farming with the stacked wire cages. I also think that because my clientele are naturally drawn to the "free-range" concept with chickens, they would expect the same standards for quail eggs. However, because the farm is a business, I have to consider efficiency when it comes to egg collecting, and I keep reading that quail tend to bury/hide eggs in an outdoor/dirt run. Opinions? Is there any way to encourage them to lay in a specific area of the aviary? Do you think I would see a noticeable decrease in egg production in an outdoor run? Thanks!
     
  2. HowieNZ

    HowieNZ Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2013
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Yes and no, I have a plastic box in each cage which are outdoors, they are opaque plastic with 2 quail size front entrances and a back entrance with a lift up flap. 8 out of 10 eggs are layed in these. I just put grass in these on the plastic floor and replace the grass every three or 4 days.
     
  3. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Bobwhites will try to hide their eggs a bit especially if you let them build a nest which they love to do, but coturnix will plop them wherever they were standing when the urge hits until they get a little older. After the first few months coturnix will usually lay all the eggs in a pile. It might be the farthest place from the door but they usually pile them for the most part. Some never will.

    As far as production decrease, probably not but if you are putting them on dirt for the first time you should think about worming them.
     

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