Is there anyone out their that is N.PI.P. certified?

houndit

There is no H or F in Orpington!
11 Years
Jul 13, 2008
2,231
108
244
Braymer Missouri
I have been considering trying to get N.P.I.P. certified. I was wondering how much of a pain is it? Is it a really big ordeal, or somthing reasonable? I talked to them at the State fair and they said the first year they test all your breeders, and after that they do not have to test ducks and geese every year. They made it sound like no big deal, but is that true. It sounds like if you have a really large operation it is easier because they only test a percentage of the birds. In the certified breeders of missouri directory their was severall people that only had one or two breeds. They sounded like a very small operation. And they were N.P.I.P. certified.
Thanks.
 

Mrs MIA

Chick Magnet
11 Years
Mar 3, 2008
7,988
58
303
I'm in the process of getting certified... a little more testing to do. The state vet came out a few weeks ago and swab tested a percentage of the birds for AI and Newcastles, then in January he's coming back down when the majority of my breeders are 16 weeks old or more. He'll take blood samples then for Pullorum and possibly other diseases. As far as I know, that's all there is to it.
There are a lot of people on here that are certified, so hopefully they can add to the experience.
 

Chickndaddy

Songster
12 Years
Jul 26, 2007
1,014
6
171
East Texas
I got certified one day after school. Jack Woods came out and tested one bird (I think) out of every pen. He might have tested the rooster and a hen. I know on the Bantam Sumatras I had shipped in that they were not NPIP certified so he tested all of them. The rest of the birds came from NPIP certified breeders or hatcheries. I did it back when it was free. If it wasn't free, then the fee was so low that a freshman in high school didn't remember how much it was. It was really easy. All I can remember him doing was taking a little sample of blood from the birds he tested and adding something to it to see if it changed colors. Then He printed out my certificate and left.
 

NYREDS

Crowing
12 Years
Jan 14, 2008
5,644
422
303
Different states, diffeent processes. Call your state Department of Agriculture & they'll explain the process.
NPIP certification for federal purposes involves testing for Pullorum only. Some states have added AI & other testing of their own to the process but for the NPIP program the other tests aren't required.
 

houndit

There is no H or F in Orpington!
11 Years
Jul 13, 2008
2,231
108
244
Braymer Missouri
If I can prove that my breeders came from N.P.I.P. certified breeders does he not have to test them?
 

Chickndaddy

Songster
12 Years
Jul 26, 2007
1,014
6
171
East Texas
I think he still has to test them originally. The thing with getting birds from other NPIP certified breeders is that you do not lose your NPIP certification when you get those birds or run the risk of having your birds get something and have to be destroyed. I could be wrong though. I don't remember....
 

mikarod

Songster
11 Years
Sep 28, 2008
1,140
7
161
Oklahoma
The thing with NPIP, at least in my state, is if you get birds from an NPIP certified flock, you don't have to have the birds tested before they arrive at your place.

I'm NPIP certified and PROUD of it! lol! I make sure and tell anyone who is interested in my birds about my NPIP certification. It makes it safer all the way around. It's kind of a "safe-guard." If their birds wind up having Newcastle, and they blame you. You have proof that it didn't come from your birds.
 

Heather J

Songster
11 Years
May 29, 2008
955
1
141
Since I read about it the other day, I've been thinking about getting certified. I'd like to sell hatching eggs in the spring, and I'd hate to lose out on a sale because I lacked certification. It would also be good knowing any eggs I ordered were coming from NPIP homes. I guess I need to call the state tomorrow and see what kind of hassle and costs I'm looking at.
 

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