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Is this a pure bred light sussex

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by brummie, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. brummie

    brummie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Every picture of light sussexes I've seen, the hens are pure white except for the balck parts around the neck and tail. However My sussex has these grey/light black shades on the wings, saddle area and back (they almost look like dirt, but trust me they are not dirt). Is this normal for some light sussex to have, or is it because my light sussex might be a cross instead of pure bred?

    Thanks in advance.

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  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I think she might just be a poorly colored, but purebred, Light Sussex. Where did you get her? Most hatcheries have purebred birds, but the birds aren't bred for show and therefore can differ in characteristics from show quality birds. Its possible as well that she has some Lavender Sussex in her, but I don't think that they are very common.
     
  3. brummie

    brummie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Now that you mention it, I think it is probably just poor/not up to standards colouring, but I think she is pure bred too. I got her from a local. (she was my first hen, I got her when I didn't know much about breeds or standards (actually I still don't know much about breeds or standards)).

    Oh well, she is still my fave chicken out of my flock of 10. Not only is she alpha hen, but she is by far the most intelligent, she seems to know exactly what I want her to do or where I want her to go. She comes a running as soon as she see's me with a mattock or spade as she seems to know I will be digging and there will be worms up for grabs, but she doesn't jump on the tools or get in the way, she seems to know she has to stand a few inches to the side, and then after I've dug up, she digs in for the grubs. She is also quite docile, but not so much that she seems stupid. She does a very good job of making a racket to call for me when perceived danger is around . And even though she is alpha hen she is not a bully, although she does have to give a few pecks here and there to put some hens back in place (unlike my second in command who is the biggest bully hen if ever there was one). She is also very hard working, remaining busy all day constantly foraging and working the land. She is also my most efficient egg layer, giving me at least 5 large eggs per week. And she's brave, not scared of going into new, unchartered territory after taking a quick look around to make sure it seems safe enough. She's almost like the perfect chicken.
     
  4. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree. Whatever she is, she's a pretty bird!
     
  5. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    She sounds very similar to my Columbian Wyandotte. [​IMG] My Wyandotte (named "Columbie") is quite intelligent too. She stands at the door of the run staring out at me when I'm outside until I let her out. She also follows me around eating dropped tomatoes that I point out to her and stealing raspberries from bushes. When Columbie wants to go outside, she makes lots of noise. She's docile, but not to the other hens! When she wants something, she tries really hard to get it (including squeezing through small gaps to get treats, etc). Columbie knows how to come when called and jump onto chairs when you point at them (but she doesn't always listen, unless you have bread or other treats!). My Columbie is fearless, too. When I had a dog, she would always go running towards him, as though her was harmless. The other chickens kept a safe distance.

    It seems like second-in-commands are always mean. My Silver-Laced Wyandotte isn't dominant, but is mean to my Easter Egger, who is least dominant. She pecks her often, and chases her away from treats. Meanwhile, my leader, Red (A Rhode Island Red), is a gentle leader that just tries to keep order. She doesn't peck nearly as much as Silver.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2013

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