Is this normal?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by schmoo, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. schmoo

    schmoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 7, 2007
    West MI.
    My Roo has just begun his "roo dance" with the ladies. I realized it was going to look grusome but whew I had no idea. Yesterday was the first time I saw it and I wasn't expecting it. I actually yelled "ROO get off her" [​IMG] As if I thought he would. I was on the other side of the fence so I couldn't grab him or anthing. I don't want him doing it when I'm there because of things I've read on here. Alpha Roo thing etc.

    My question is.....I knew he was going to grab their feathers to hold on, but I saw him grab ones waddle and hold her down that way. I thought it was bleeding and went in the fence to check her, but it seemed more like a blood blister- not bleeding. Sheesh [​IMG]
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    To quote someone in a book I read, " Chicken sex is short and not sweet." Sums it up.
     
  3. lurky

    lurky Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 4, 2007
    Western MA
    Well i have yet to witness this, from the stories, i am not looking forward to the accidental sighting. [​IMG]
     
  4. Country Gal

    Country Gal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Capac, MI
    Totally normal. I catch my BO roo in the act AT LEAST 4 times a day! And that's after I get home from work!!! He grabs onto the girls combs and climbs on, does his business, then usually starts running after one of the other girls.

    I actually think I need to add more hens to the flock because the BO roo won't let the OEGB roo anywhere near the girls...
     
  5. schmoo

    schmoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 7, 2007
    West MI.
    Thanks all. I guess I'll just have to keep my eye on their combs for wounds. My Roo outta be happy he has 21 ladies all to himself. [​IMG]
     
  6. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    When cockrels are still learning which end it goes in, it's not uncommon for them to grab waddles, combs, feathers and beaks. Eventually they get it worked out and it will become less a Greco-Roman wrestling match. You'll also notice once the hens realize what's going on that they'll actually stop and present themselves which makes things a lot quicker.
     
  7. jenichick

    jenichick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    NC
    Our hens are getting used to the "roo thang" and most of them will let him jump on now. It's seemed much more aggressive in the beginning. He'll still chase one down every now and then but when he finally gets hold it's over quickly.

    edited for grammar
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2007
  8. Frozen Feathers

    Frozen Feathers Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2007
    Maine
    Roos can get pretty aggressive with the ladies...especially when they are learning. My BSL comb is messed up from the Phoenix when he was young. He's much "gentler" now and only grabs their neck feathers. [​IMG]
     
  9. wegotchickens

    wegotchickens DownSouth D'Uccles & Silkies

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    Jul 5, 2007
    Sevier County, TN
    Our roo cut up the wattle near one of our BO's ears the other day. It didn't look good so I put some neosporin on it. He's really rough. The only hen that will lay down for him is the one that's laying eggs (4 so far!).
    The others aren't laying yet, or laying down with the roo. So I guess I have a while before we get more eggs from the other peeps.

    Also, he's a Silkie roo. He takes 'Ride 'em Cowboy' too seriously and is currently only polishing Daisy Mae's back. Will he ever fertilize an egg, or is he built wrong for it?
     
  10. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    When our roo started cleaning feathers from the backs of the ladies we started rounding off the tips of his spurs with a heavy grit emery board. No more scratches/bruises on sides/no more bare backs (still gets a few feathers from their heads, never has wounded any combs or wattles). Spurs are now in need of being twisted off - over two inches, but the tips are rounded off and harmless to the ladies, though he can still deliver a telling blow through mud boots.
     

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