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Ivermectin withdrawal period

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Patoot, Oct 15, 2010.

  1. Patoot

    Patoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If I used Ivermectin paste for the girls, is the withdrawal time 14 days to eat the eggs? One girl started laying yesterday (and I already have 2 eggs) so I am anxious to try one out. I won't eat those since it's within the 14 days, but tomorrow is day 14. Can I eat them starting this weekend? Just for information, what is the problem with eating the eggs before the time is up (I don't plan to)? Do you get wormer in you or do you have the potential to eat a worm or worm eggs or something? I don't want to eat anything bad for me. What if you are pregnant? I am not, but a friend is and she wanted to try some next week.

    Bree
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

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    Last edited: Sep 18, 2011
  3. Bat Cave Silkies

    Bat Cave Silkies Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 11, 2010
    Bat Cave, NC
    I've used the Ivermectin oil based pour on, on all my poultry for years. I never wait to eat the eggs......hasn't hurt any of us [​IMG]
     
  4. Patoot

    Patoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think I'm being overly paranoid. I haven't eaten any eggs yet and I probably should. She has laid an egg everyday since starting on Thursday. Today is 16 days post Ivermectin. If the withdrawal period is 14 days for the pour on, it should stand to reason it is the same for the paste. It's not like it's still in their stomachs and the majority of the wormer should be out of them by now. Since some people advise waiting longer, it makes we worry. The majority of posts do indicate a 14 day wait or even less (if you aren't selling them).

    I'm a dork.

    Bree
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Jacksonville, Florida
    Quote:You're not paranoid nor a dork, just cautious. Fourteen days is the normal withdrawal period for ALL wormers except eprinex. You havnt made that omelet yet?
     
  6. Patoot

    Patoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No, no omelet yet. [​IMG] Okay, okay, if 14 is for sure the standard for ALL wormers, I suppose it should be just fine. Is 14 days conservative too? Like is it probably fine after a week to 10 days, but we/they say 14 days to be on the safe side?

    Bree
     
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:I'm sure I explained this to you before in a PM. But, one more time wont hurt I suppose. Once you administer the wormer; it takes time to go through their system, time to dislodge to paralyze or kill them, time to excrete them or absorb them as protein, and time for the wormer to be expelled from their system as well. Remember, wormers are poisons. Fourteen days is the norm for withdrawal. If anyone eats eggs prior to 14 days, they could be possibly injesting the poison...however so slight, and they could possibly have an adverse reaction. If someone eats the eggs or chicken prior to 14 days, that's their choice. That's your choice as well. I personally, wait the 14 days. Additionally they should be rewormed again 14 days after the first worming to kill larva, using a different wormer. So, another 14 days withdrawal. Lucky you dont have cattle...it's 48 days withdrawal for cattle slaughter using ivermectin pour on.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2010
  8. Patoot

    Patoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You did explain it to me. I did know the rationale. What I didn't know is whether 14 days was a conservative or liberal recommendation. If most of the wormer was out after 9 days, but could potentially be there on day 13, it would be a conservative estimate. If a minute amount of wormer is still in there on day 12 or 13, then it is more liberal. It's probably just semantics.

    I wonder why it's longer for cattle? Maybe that's what the previous poster was talking about when she said a 2 month wait.

    Thanks.

    Bree
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2010

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