Jersey wooly rabbit info

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by PrinceSandwich, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. PrinceSandwich

    PrinceSandwich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 11, 2009
    Alberta, Canada
    I might be getting some Jersey wooly rabbits, and I'm just wondering if anybody has any info/pics of them?
     
  2. feathersgalore

    feathersgalore Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 4, 2008
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    My daughters and I breed and show Jersey Woolies. They are a great breed. Very laid back and even with all the hair require little grooming as an adult. Here are some of mine - baby pictures, junior picture & adult. You'll love them.

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  3. blueoval1

    blueoval1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 21, 2008
    Raleigh N.C.
    I have been wanting a wooly for a long time but I cant find a breeder in my area.

    Wow yours are beautiful I wish you were closer.

    Does anyone else have any info on them?
     
  4. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    Nov 27, 2009
    Wilmington, NC
    Quote:How far are you willing to go? I'm planning some litters in the Spring. If you go to ARBA's website and check under the show listings, I know you'll find a couple of shows that will be within an hour's drive of Raleigh this Spring. I'll guarantee you that somebody will have Woolies for sale at a show.

    The Jersey Wooly is pretty much a Netherland Dwarf with long hair. Good Dwarf type is good Wooly type, if you allow for the fact that the Wooly is about a half-pound bigger. The ideal Wooly has a French Angora coat. The high percentage of guard hairs means that the coat just doesn't mat up like you might think a long hair would. Except for a little around "the seat of the pants," most of my Woolies' coats require no brushing at all, unless they are actively molting. Unfortunately, you can still find Woolies with the cottony coats, they do take quite a bit more care.

    All rabbits need lots of fiber in their diets to keep their digestive systems rockin' along properly. This is especially true for the long haired breeds, because they are more prone to a condition called "wool block." Wool block happens when the hair they ingest while grooming builds up in their stomachs, it's more or less analgous to an impaction colic in horses. Good quality grass hay does the job nicely. Papaya contains an enzyme that is supposed to help break up any fur accumulations, so a lot people will add it to a rabbit's diet as well. It can be fed dried (just a small amount, it contains a lot of sugar, too!) or the enzyme itself is available in tablet form.
     
  5. blueoval1

    blueoval1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 21, 2008
    Raleigh N.C.
    Quote:How far are you willing to go? I'm planning some litters in the Spring. If you go to ARBA's website and check under the show listings, I know you'll find a couple of shows that will be within an hour's drive of Raleigh this Spring. I'll guarantee you that somebody will have Woolies for sale at a show.

    The Jersey Wooly is pretty much a Netherland Dwarf with long hair. Good Dwarf type is good Wooly type, if you allow for the fact that the Wooly is about a half-pound bigger. The ideal Wooly has a French Angora coat. The high percentage of guard hairs means that the coat just doesn't mat up like you might think a long hair would. Except for a little around "the seat of the pants," most of my Woolies' coats require no brushing at all, unless they are actively molting. Unfortunately, you can still find Woolies with the cottony coats, they do take quite a bit more care.

    All rabbits need lots of fiber in their diets to keep their digestive systems rockin' along properly. This is especially true for the long haired breeds, because they are more prone to a condition called "wool block." Wool block happens when the hair they ingest while grooming builds up in their stomachs, it's more or less analgous to an impaction colic in horses. Good quality grass hay does the job nicely. Papaya contains an enzyme that is supposed to help break up any fur accumulations, so a lot people will add it to a rabbit's diet as well. It can be fed dried (just a small amount, it contains a lot of sugar, too!) or the enzyme itself is available in tablet form.

    HI I am willing to travel a little ways. I will most likely be at Topsail Beach some this spring hopefully i will be there when you have some for sale.
     

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