Just lost a rooster to a coyote

Rowzy

In the Brooder
10 Years
Feb 12, 2009
87
0
39
Renton, WA
I lost my black silky rooster to a coyote today. I've lost a fair number of hens to predators (probably 5) but that was in the past and I thought I had fixed the problem because there was a fallen down fence that I hadnt seen before (the entire property is double fenced, once fence about 50 - 100' behind the other. The previous owners did this.) I wasn't sure what was killing them today but now I am almost fairly sure it was the coyotes. I was outside taking care of my horses when the chickens started making a racket. I ran out of the barn in time to see the coyote staring at me with the chicken in his mouth
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. I chased it off but now I dont know if it will come back again.
What would be the best way to keep my hens safe besides keeping them locked up 24/7 (which was my family's solution!)? It just isnt logical for me to create a run with the way that my property is. Last summer I didnt have any problems with predators. Is it just less likely I will loose hens in the summer because there is enough bunnies/other prey for them to not need to work their way onto my property. I usually try to put my golden retriever out with the chickens and he will bark at anything that comes around, but he is getting too old for gaurd duty now and my other dog would just kill the chickens.
 

Kittymomma

Songster
10 Years
Sep 9, 2009
3,873
31
204
Olympia, WA
Chickens are an easier meal then their natural prey and it makes more sense for them to take the easier prey--less energy used hunting = more energy stored for winter. A good flock friendly dog is your best bet, my steers hate coyotes too and will run them off during the day too. I have heard of people using mules and/or llamas, but they'll try to kill your dogs too. I keep a browning .270 handy here and it has been a great help for yotes that get by the dogs and steers. Sorry you lost you're roo!
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If you can run a few strands of electric on your exisiting fence that may help too. If none of this is possible you'll need to put the chooks on lockdown or lose more.
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Kacey's Krazee's

Songster
Aug 8, 2009
308
10
191
Normangee, Texas
Sorry about your 'roo.
I am certian you didn't chase off the coyote, as now they know where to go and find something to eat, and not have to work as hard for it.
I don't think you have many options short of putting them in lockdown 24/7. I have mine in a coop and run, but would love to see them roaming
around the yard, but I know it's in their best interest to keep them there.

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Rowzy

In the Brooder
10 Years
Feb 12, 2009
87
0
39
Renton, WA
I know I didn't chase it off for good, just for right then.
Im wondering if maybe because my horses are in my upper pasture in the summer which is next to the chicken coop that they keep the coyotes out a bit more? My horses are known to attack my dogs unprovoked if the dogs get into the pastures.
 

Kittymomma

Songster
10 Years
Sep 9, 2009
3,873
31
204
Olympia, WA
Quote:
They might help, but I wouldn't depend on them anymore then I do on my coyote hating steers. Eventually the coyote(s) will be back. I'm able to take terminal action and they still show back up every couple of weeks or sometimes months, chicken dinner is just too irresistable. I know by freeranging I'll lose some regardless of the dogs, steers, and rifle. If you're going to freerange you'll lose more too.
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It's a decision we all have to make.
 

NitaAZ

In the Brooder
10 Years
Apr 21, 2009
83
2
29
I have three horses in the pasture with our chickens, and I'm still losing chickens to coyotes. We've extended the fence to 7 feet high, and the coyotes are still jumping it (my daughter saw one do it this week - she went out and scared it off).

I don't know what our next step in coyote control will be.
 

OkieDave

In the Brooder
9 Years
Feb 18, 2010
20
0
22
Tulsa/Skiatook Lake
you can be sure it will return. my experiece is to be ready with a gun. I have shot several. also, dogs are pretty effective once they figure out the coyote is coming back but the dogs only chase them away.
 

Rowzy

In the Brooder
10 Years
Feb 12, 2009
87
0
39
Renton, WA
Do you think a tractor would keep them safe? I know it would have to be heavy duty enough that the coyotes cant knock it over, but would they dig under it? How large would a tractor have to be for 8 chickens?
 

Kittymomma

Songster
10 Years
Sep 9, 2009
3,873
31
204
Olympia, WA
If you attach an apron to the tractor I think it would work. Figure on roughly 10 square feet of outside space per bird so 80 square feet--might need to do two smaller ones if you want to be able to move it easily.
 

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