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keeping predators away with no fence

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by poultry guy, Aug 26, 2011.

  1. poultry guy

    poultry guy Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2011
    I have a flock of 70 chickens have of wich are still babies and i'm looking into getting geese to scare of a fox we have living near us and i was wondering what kind to get!

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  2. M.sue

    M.sue Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2011
    Michigan
    My DH's buddy swears a Grey African Goose is the best guard you can get. He raised chickens for 20 yrs., lived up north with a lot of prediators lurking for for a snack and says he never lost one once he got the goose!
     
  3. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    I seriously doubt that a goose of any breed can successfully guard a flock against fox. Perhap a vixen or partially grown kit, but a dog fox or a pair working together would just eat the goose first.
     
  4. poultry guy

    poultry guy Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2011
    it is a red tailed fox and as far as we know there is only one evedince being: we've only seen one, we've only lost one or two chickens and there's been no evdedince of small dog-like activity no scat no nothing exept a sighting and the loss of one or two chickens.

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    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
  5. M.sue

    M.sue Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2011
    Michigan
    Quote:We have fox & coyote and that is exactly what I told my husband. A pack would have the goose for an appetizer and my chicks for the main course! It was just what popped into my thoughts.
     
  6. aprophet

    aprophet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:X2 a number 1 1/2 sized trap and a "dirt hole set" whack and stack [​IMG]
     
  7. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Red foxes usually hold territory as a pair. I have never seen them hunt as a group although I have seen or parent or other (both will do it) catch live prey and present it to kits. I do not think goose of any breed will go out of its way to defend chickens from flock. My neighbor has a mixed flock of geese the local red foxes harass but foxes only take his chickens. The fox probably could catch a goose but chickens are easier and foxes are all about easy.

    Dog(s) way to go protect free ranging chickens. Dog(s) of proper size can also keep coyotes out. Dog must be ballsy, lap dogs and wimps will not do trick. Dog must be willing to put on good bluff and then be willing to back it up if fox / coyote stands its ground.
     
  8. poultry guy

    poultry guy Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2011
    I read somewere that geese defend there terriotory is this true and if it is will they be ok with chickens on their turf we have around five acres with about 1/3 of it cut of from the chickens and if they let them on their turf how many geese should i get and wich breed defend their teritory the most

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    Last edited: Aug 27, 2011
  9. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    Yep Dogs. Though it has to be a well socialized with poultry and or Livestock Guardian Dog. My neighbor had two dogs one Golden Lab and one German Shepherd. They regularly patrolled his twenty acres and Mine. Marking their territory in the process. My property is not so much at risk from foxes, (they do live in the desert) but at risk from Coyotes. I loved those dogs they were like book ends on the driveway when ever I would come home and they treated me like family. So happy to see me. Sigh.... they died (long story) and the Coyotes came back.

    I adopted a flock of six Guinea Fowl and they did quite a good job of dealing with single coyotes. They would gang up on one and Chi Chi Chi at him and swipe those sharp beaks at him and chased him down the driveway. They are also good at spotting overhead predators and sounding the alarm. Though these were adults and I took the time to imprint them on their home, which means locking them in the coop for about four to six weeks so that they remember where to come home. Their down side is that they are NOISY and tend to sound the alarm if something new is on the property like.... a new bucket or something leaned against the fence. And some people have problems with having them mixed with their chickens, I never did.

    Guineas also alarm when strange people come on the property another reason I got them and the main reason I have them now. Being two miles from the border. I also like the noise and the silly stupid things they do.... I recognize that Guineas are not for everyone for sure.
     
  10. poultry guy

    poultry guy Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2011
    Thanks but i know a person whos been raising gunieas for years and she says there dumb as a rock and chickens are totaly smart compared to them she says guniea hens are so dumb they forget were they lay there eggs maybe it just depends on the guniea will you tell us the type of guniea and were you got them

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