Kraut and Kimche Recipes

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by joebryant, Jan 1, 2011.

  1. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    BASICS OF OUR SAUERKRAUT-MAKING PROCESS


    We use a 5-liter Harsch Fermenting Crock, so all the measurements are for that amount. The Harsch crock is airtight, so no mold will form. This amount is plenty for us and for our friends too.[​IMG]
    ”Harsch Fermenting Crocks are beautifully crafted stoneware pots from Germany which produce delicious pickled vegetables in just 4-6 weeks from cabbages, pumpkins, cucumbers, carrots, beans, celery, onions, peppers & more. These beautifully crafted stoneware fermenting crocks from Germany produce sauerkraut and other pickled vegetables very simply. Their use of ceramic weight stones eliminates mold while their clever water sealing system allows fermentation gasses to escape without allowing air to enter the crock. Simple instructions for use and recipes are included.”

    We got our crock from canningpantry.com. (ETA It's cheaper now at Amazon.com and shipping is less), and It was the lowest price, and the shipping was free (ETA Shipping is high now.). That was two years ago, so hopefully it is still the case.

    You can make kraut in a glass jar or in any crock. Do not use metal or plastic. The brine must cover the cabbage, so you should weigh it down. You may have to scrape mold off the top using the jar or plain crock method.

    The basic proportion of salt is 2 teaspoons to each pound of cabbage.

    The salt protects the cabbage mixture from harmful bacteria until the lacto-bacteria from the cabbage can make lactic acid to begin the fermentation process; the lactic acid then stops the harmful bacteria. We like ours with the salt for flavor as well.

    Since Joe is supposed to watch his sodium, we have tried a couple of low-salt recipes, using wine and some other spices. We weren’t too happy with the flavor.

    We like the cabbage shredded into fairly large pieces rather than grated like the veggie kraut at LFI. We started out shredding it with a food processor, but lately we have been buying the slaw mix at Sam’s Club. (I thought Isia would disapprove of this, but she doesn’t.)

    After you pound the cabbage and salt, let it sit (just a short time) so more liquid will come out. If you don’t have enough liquid to cover, you can make a brine (2 cups water to 2 T. sea salt) with chlorine-free water because chlorine will kill the good bacteria.

    We started out with published recipes, then just started to experiment. We both like garlic and red pepper, so we use a lot of them.

    Give us a call if you have any questions or want to tell us how it’s going.

    Joe and Anne Bryant
    317-535-5855
    BASIC SAUERKRAUT RECIPE #1

    12 pounds cabbage (weigh the heads) shredded in food processor (not grated)
    8 T. sea salt (1/2 cup) (use 2 teaspoonsful per pound of cabbage)
    3 T. caraway seeds
    1 1/2 T. dill
    1 head chopped garlic (1 T. +)

    Pound until juices come out. May let stand for juice to come out.
    Put in crock and leave it for a week or longer, according to taste.


    BASIC SAUERKRAUT RECIPE #2

    12 pounds cabbage - weigh the heads and shred (or use slaw mix)
    1/2 cup of sea salt
    2 T. caraway seed
    2 tsp. dill
    2 tsp. red pepper flakes
    1 head of garlic

    Pound until juices come out. May let stand for juice to come out.
    Put in crock and leave it for a week or longer, according to taste.


    BASIC SAUERKRAUT RECIPE #3

    This one uses juniper berries.

    Mix and pound:

    9 lbs. slaw mix (green and red cabbage and carrots)
    (or cabbage shredded in food processor)
    6 T. sea salt

    Mix and add:

    2 T. whole juniper berries
    2 T. whole caraway seeds
    ½ head chopped garlic




    BASIC SAUERKRAUT RECIPE #4


    Kraut with Pepper

    9 lbs. Cabbage slaw mix from Sam’s
    4 T. sea salt
    2 T. dulse flakes
    3 T. caraway seed
    1 jar (8 oz.) organic chopped garlic
    2 T. red pepper flakes
    2 tsp. Dill – powdered
    1 cup of whey (drained from homemade yogurt)



    Wine kraut

    Mix and pound:

    6 lbs. shredded cabbage (Sam’s slaw mix)
    4 tsp. sea salt

    Chop with Vidalia chopper or by hand:
    3 peppers (red, yellow, orange)
    2 small turnips
    ½ head cauliflower
    3 cloves garlic
    2 Granny Smith apples, unpeeled

    Mix together and add:

    2 T. ground caraway
    2 T. celery seed
    2 T. dill

    Mix all together and pound again.

    Put in crock and add Chardonnay to cover (about ½ a bottle).


    Using these spices and wine enable you to use less salt.
    Anne Bryant’s
    VEGGIE KRAUT


    This is for a 5 liter Harsch crock.

    Mix and pound:

    6 lbs. shredded cabbage (weigh the heads or use slaw mix)
    1/2 of small head of red cabbage - shredded
    4 ounces dry dulse flakes (buy at health food store)
    3/8 cup (6 Tbsp) of sea salt
    1 Tbsp ground caraway seed
    1 Tbsp garlic powder

    ****
    After pounding chop with the small plate of a Vidalia Chopper (or by hand) and add:

    1/2 head cauliflower (no stems - use only small floret pieces)
    3 peppers - red, orange, yellow
    4 carrots (They were in the Sam’s slaw mix.)
    2 medium beets
    2 medium turnips
    2 tsp red pepper flakes

    Mix all together and put in the Harsch crock for two weeks.
    _____
    We also made a LOW-SALT batch of the above recipe using two tablespoons of salt in two cups of COOLED boiled water. If you don't use distilled water, you have to boil the tap water to burn off the chlorine in it because the chlorine will kill the fermentation bacteria, ruining your kraut.
    CAUTION: Do not try making low-salt kraut in a regular crock. Kraut fermentation done the "regular" way requires at least two teaspoonfuls of salt for every pound of cabbage the first three days of fermentation to fight dangerous bacteria. After three days though the lactic acid takes over destroying bacteria.
    I've read several places that say you can make NO-SALT kraut in a Harsch crock, but I'd be afraid to try it... never have, never will.
    See: http://schmidling.com/kraut.htm
    "The sauerkraut fermentation process utilizes the indigenous population of bacteria in the raw cabbage to produce lactic acid. This produces a low pH environment that allows few if any other bacteria to survive. The lactic acid is also what gives the kraut its characteristic sour flavor. Salt is added to the raw cabbage to draw out much of the water (drier product keeps longer) and to inhibit salt-intolerant bacteria. This allows the acid-producing bacteria to get a strong foothold and dominate the population."

    Veggie kraut 12-17-09

    Mix and pound:

    6 lbs. Shredded cabbage (Sam’s Club)
    (green and red plus carrots)
    4 oz. Dulse flakes
    3/8 cup sea salt (6 T.)
    1 T. ground caraway
    1 T. garlic powder
    2 tsp. Red pepper flakes

    (I combine the seasonings first.)


    Chop small (with Vidalia chopper):

    ½ head cauliflower
    3 peppers (two red, one yellow)
    3 small beets, peeled
    2 medium turnips, unpeeled


    Mix all together.



    Anne Bryant’s
    VEGGIE KRAUT

    This is for a 5 liter Harsch crock.

    6 lbs. shredded cabbage (weigh the heads)
    1/2 of small head of red cabbage - shredded
    4 ounces dry dulce flakes (buy at health food store)
    3/8 cup (6 Tbsp) of sea salt
    1 Tbsp ground caraway see
    1 Tbsp garlic powder
    Mix and pound
    ****
    After pounding
    ADD the following vegetable after they've been put through
    the small chopper plate of a Vidalia Chopper.
    1/2 head cauliflower (no stems - use only small floret pieces)
    3 peppers - red, orange, yellow
    4 carrots
    2 medium beets
    2 medium turnips
    2 tsp red pepper flakes

    Mix all together and put in the Harsch crock for two weeks.
    _____
    We also made a LOW-SALT batch of the above recipe using two tablespoons of salt in two cups of COOLED boiled water. If you don't use distilled water, you have to boil the tap water to burn off the chlorine in it because the chlorine will kill the fermentation bacteria, ruining your kraut.
    CAUTION: Do not try making low-salt kraut in a regular crock. Kraut fermentation done the "regular" way requires at least two teaspoonfuls of salt for every pound of cabbage the first three days of fermentation to fight dangerous bacteria. After three days though the lactic acid takes over destroying bacteria.
    I've read several places that say you can make NO-SALT kraut in a Harsch crock, but I'd be afraid to try it... never have, never will.

    Here are Anne's BASIC RECIPES for the 5 liter Harsch crock:

    12 pound cabbage (weight the heads) shredded in food processor
    8 T. sea salt (1/2 cup) (use 2 teaspoonsful per pound of cabbage)
    3 T. caraway sees
    1 1/2 T. dill
    1 head chopped garlic (1 T. +)

    Pound until juices come out. May let stand for juice to come out.
    Put in crock and leave it for a week or longer, according to taste.

    *************

    12 pounds cabbage - weigh the heads and shred
    1/2 cup of sea salt
    2 T. caraway seed
    2 tsp. dill
    2 tsp. red pepper flakes
    1 head of garlic

    Pound until juices come out. May let stand for juice to come out.
    Put in crock and leave it for a week or longer, according to taste.

    **************************************************************
    Here's the recipe that we made up for "low salt" WINE KRAUT that we made yesterday:
    ***********
    6 lbs. of chopped green and red cabbage and carrots (2 3# pkg.s from Sam's)
    2 T. each ground caraway, celery seed, and dill (from health food store)
    2 T. dulse flakes
    3 peppers - red, yellow, orange
    2 small turnips
    1/2 head cauliflower
    3 cloves of garlic
    4 tsp. sea salt
    2 Granny Smith apples, unpeeled

    Pound cabbage mixture with salt
    Chop veggies and apples with Vidalia chopper
    Mix spices
    Mix all together
    Pound again
    Put in the Harsch pot and cover with the stones
    Add 1/2 bottle of Chardonnay wine to cover the stones and kraut mixture.


    KIMCHI
    Kimchi – Korean Sauerkraut (Anne’s recipe)

    Harsch crock - 2/3 full

    2 heads of Napa cabbage – shredded
    3 bunches of green onions – chopped
    1 pound of carrots – grated
    1 large Daikon radish –grated
    1 Tablespoon ginger – grated + chopped
    1 heaping Tablespoon pre-chopped garlic (jar from grocery)
    1 ½ teaspoons dried chili pepper flakes
    1 cup of whey from after straining yogurt (see yogurt recipe)
    2 Tablespoon sea salt (6 Tablespoonsful if you don’t use whey)

    Leave in Harsch crock for at least three days (2-3 weeks better)s.

    OR
    If you don’t have a Harsch crock, you can make it in a half-gallon, wide-mouth glass jar.
    Place vegetables, ginger, garlic, chile flakes, sea salt and whey in a bowl and pound with a wooden pounder or meat hammer to release juices. Let rest ten minutes. Place in a quart sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a pounder until juices come to the top of the vegetables. The top of the vegetables should be at least one inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about three days before transferring to cold storage.
    Variation: For a different flavor, 1 tablespoon organic, naturally brewed soy sauce may be added.

    KIMCHI (KOREAN SAUERKRAUT)
    Makes two quarts
    (A variety of vegetables may be used)
    1 head Napa cabbage, cored and shredded
    1 bunch green onions, chopped
    1 cup carrots, grated
    1/2 cup dailon radish, grated
    1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
    3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
    1/2 teaspoon dried chile flakes
    1 tablespoon grey sea salt
    4 tablespoons whey (or 1 additional tablespoon sea salt)
    Place vegetables, ginger, garlic, chile flakes, sea salt and whey in a bowl and pound with a wooden pounder or meat hammer to release juices. Let rest ten minutes. Place in a quart sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a pounder until juices come to the top of the vegetables. The top of the vegetables should be at least one inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about three days before transferring to cold storage.
    Variation: For a different flavor, 1 tablespoon organic, naturally brewed soy sauce may be added.
    Blue Planet Kim Chee
    (From Kate in St. Augustine)

    Chinese cabbage
    Shredded carrot
    Ginger – chopped
    Garlic – chopped
    Dill
    Sea salt – 2 tsp. / pound
    Red chili pepper if desired.

    Layer cabbage between other vegetables, because it’s the cabbage that will ferment and protect the other vegetables.
    Put into glass or ceramic container and let ferment for a couple of days or more. Then keep in the refrigerator.


    Note: For the 5-liter Harsch crock we used four or five stalks of Chinese cabbage, a pound of carrots, a head of garlic, quite a bit of ginger, and I don’t know how much dill. I think we used the red pepper too, but I can’t remember.


    Dill Pickles
    [This is a recipe for fermented kosher-style dills. It only uses a little bit of vinegar to inhibit microorganisms. I recommend buying a Gärtopf crock if you like to make pickles and sauerkraut regularly.]
    Use the following quantities for each gallon of your container’s capacity.
    · 4 lb. pickling cucumbers (4-inch)
    · 2 Tbsp dill seed or 4 to 5 heads fresh or dry dill weed [note: dill heads are superior to seed. Frozen heads of fresh dill taste better than fresh, since the cell walls are broken down by freezing. Stick your dill in the freezer after buying it at the market and harvesting the heads]
    · 2 cloves garlic (optional) [note: NOT optional [​IMG]]
    · 2 dried red peppers (optional)
    · 2 tsp whle mixed pickling spices (optional)
    · 1/2 cup salt
    · 1/4 cup vinegar (5%) [note: European vinegars have more acidity, so they're ok to use, but don't use 4% vinegars, which are also on the market. Standard white vinegar is usually 5%]
    · 8 cups water [note: if you have hard water, use bottled water. Soft water is ok.]
    · [note: a few fresh, washed grape leaves can be added to the container if you have them, to retard softening. Concord are best.]
    Procedure: Wash cucumbers. Cut a 1/16-inch slice off blossom end [note: i.e., not the stem end. It's usually the smaller, lighter-color end of the cucumber], but leave 1/4 inch of stem on the other end. [Poke cucumbers with a knitting needle or thin chopstick to aid pickling.] Place half of dill and half of other flavorings on bottom of a clean, suitable container [i.e. a crock or food grade plastic or glass containers, preferably 3 quarts or larger. DON'T use small jars for this recipe, as they won't allow proper fermentation]. Add [grape leaves,] cucumbers, remaining dill, and flavorings. Dissolve salt in vinegar and water and pour over cucumbers. Add suitable weight [if you don't have a crock with a weight in it, I recommend a gallon-sized Ziploc bag filled with brine (1 1/2 tablespoons of salt per 1 quart water) that you close up and place snugly in the container after filling it. Double-bag for security, but if it leaks, the brine is the same concentration as the brine in the container.] and cover [with a clean towel. Do not seal the container or the fermenting may make the lid blow off. If you are using a crock, follow the manufacturer's instructions about the lid].
    Store where temperature is 70 to 75 degrees F for about 3 to 4 weeks. Temperatures of 55 to 65 are acceptable [and in my opinion, make much better pickles], but the fermentation will take 5 to 6 weeks. Pickles will become too soft if temperatures are above 80 degrees during fermentation.
    Check the container several times a week and promptly remove surface scum or mold. [I find that with a Gartopf crock, I don't get mold, since the seal is air-tight, so I don't check it that often.]
    Caution: if the pickles become soft or slimy, or if they develop a disagreeable odor, discard them. [Without tasting them!!!]
    Fully fermented pickles may be stored in the original container for 4 to 6 months, provided you refrigerate them and remove surface scum and molds regularly.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2011
  2. mercedes

    mercedes Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 4, 2010
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    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] Now I want one of those fermenting crocks.I remember my grandmother making her sauerkraut in a big stone pot like that.Thank you for the great recipes.
     
  3. KatyTheChickenLady

    KatyTheChickenLady Bird of A Different Feather

    Dec 20, 2008
    Boise, Idaho
    Thankyou so much!!! ordering the crock today.

    ordered the 7.5 liter one, they were out of the 10 liter . . . and they now charge for shipping, bummer, but can't wait to get it!
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2011
  4. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Last edited: Jan 1, 2011
  5. TerriLaChicks

    TerriLaChicks Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 23, 2008
    Central Louisiana
    Sounds great! will look into ordering one of those crocks tomorrow! thanks for posting the recipes!
     
  6. FowlDelights

    FowlDelights Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 17, 2009
    Elgin, Tx
    joebryant

    Do you have any problem with the vacuum that occurs once the percolating stops? A couple of times I have found my batches diluted and was wondering if the vacuum effect draws water into the crock?

    Thanks, Ron
     
  7. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I've often wondered about that myself because I was not sure that the kraut itself produced as much liquid as was in the crock when I opened it. I just now got a return call from my local water company. I had called them and left a message that I needed to know whether they used chlorine or chloromine; they told me that they use chlorine, and that was a relief because if water in the moat is sucked in it's undoubtedly after the chlorine burned off. It has never been a problem. If it were a problem, I'd buy a jug of distilled water and use it rather than tap water that had been treated with chloromine.

    **********
    joebryant wrote:

    WoodlandWoman wrote:

    When water used to be treated with chlorine, people did say to leave it sit out, to dissipate the chlorine. Most water treatment plants have gone to using chloramine, because it's a more stable compound. For chloramine treated water, people do have to use conditioners for their fish. I wouldn't use chloramine treated water for culturing. Thats my understanding, anyway.

    Stainless steel is not as reactive as other metals, like aluminum. That's why you never cook acidic foods like tomatoes in an aluminum pot, but you can cook them in a stainless steel pot.

    This is a very interesting thread!

    HOLY MOLEY, WOODLANDWOMAN, THANKS! I HOPE EVERYONE READS YOUR POST. PERSONALLY I HAD NEVER EVEN HEARD OF CHLORAMINE BEFORE. AS SOON AS I GET HOME, I'M GOING TO CALL MY WATER COMPANY TO SEE IF THEY USE IT INSTEAD OF CHLORINE. IF THEY DO, I WILL NEVER USE IT FOR MAKING ANYTHING PROBIOTIC AGAIN.
    I DID A GOOGLE SEARCH, AND BOILING AND LETTING THE TAP WATER SIT OUT DOES NOT GET RID OF CHLORAMINE.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2011
  8. KatyTheChickenLady

    KatyTheChickenLady Bird of A Different Feather

    Dec 20, 2008
    Boise, Idaho
    still waiting for my crock . . . [​IMG]
     
  9. WhiteMountainsRanch

    WhiteMountainsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sandy Eggo, CA
    Wow... someday! [​IMG]
     
  10. KatyTheChickenLady

    KatyTheChickenLady Bird of A Different Feather

    Dec 20, 2008
    Boise, Idaho
    well, I ordered one, the site said 2-3 day delivery but now the delivery status says 3-6 day delivery so Monday or Tue maybe. I can't wait!!! My husbands grandparents immigrated from Germany and I have their ancient wooden Kraut slicer. we are so excited to think about using this piece of his family history.
     

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