kunekune space requirement

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by mendozer, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. mendozer

    mendozer Chillin' With My Peeps

    316
    3
    119
    Feb 27, 2011
    seattle
    So I'm toying with the thought of getting a kunekune to pair with my chickens this spring. I plan to build a coop with a small door linking it to a 6 x 12 chain link kennel. But today I just thought (what if I add one pig in the run?)

    Kunekunes can just graze and I regularly throw scraps in the run for the chickens like grass clippings and kitchen waste. Thoughts?
     
  2. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

    4,356
    202
    258
    Jan 19, 2011
    Escanaba, MI
    They'll need so much more space than 6 x 12. Especially if you expect them to be able to graze. That tiny of a space will turn into dirt in a week, even with just a single pig.

    Pigs have also been known to eat chickens if they get the chance. It is such a common occurrence. If you don't believe me, do a quick Google search, and read all the cases where pigs have devoured chickens. I guess if you consider your chickens expendable, then go for it. But if you want both chickens and pigs, keep them separate.
     
  3. mendozer

    mendozer Chillin' With My Peeps

    316
    3
    119
    Feb 27, 2011
    seattle
    o wow I thought kunes would just be simple vegetarians. Didn't realize they'd go for chicken. ok well that plan's dead in the water
     
  4. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

    6,821
    325
    331
    Mar 5, 2007
    Phoenix, AZ
    I agree with Stacykins. All pigs are omnivores and if bored, they will certainly go after chickens or even each other! There's no reason you couldn't keep a few separate though, but they would definitely need a larger space kunekunes still get quite large.

    I really don't advocate keeping other animals (besides other species of fowl) with chickens. It's just too difficult to regulate feed, and most other species cannot eat poultry feed (especially goats, sheep, cows, etc).

    If you do go win pigs down the line, I would definitely be ready for them to root up your entire pasture. That was something we weren't expecting when we took on a rescue pig found wondering a city. He was a great pet though.
     
  5. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

    4,356
    202
    258
    Jan 19, 2011
    Escanaba, MI
    Alas, they will be if only able to access vegetarian fare! But a chicken, if the pig is motivated and/or the chicken compromised, will be eaten with no hesitation.

    I'm actually bringing home some Idaho Pasture Pigs, which have Kunekune blood in them. But my plan is to train them to an electric fence setup that I can move (the electric fence will first be inside a permanent fence setup so they'll be double fenced while learning the electric isn't to be toyed with). That way, once an area gets grazed on for a few days, I can move them to the next spot before the grass gets worn out. Pigs are smart, they learn electric fences bite. In fact, many people who keep pigs fenced in permanent pens line the inside of the bottom of the fence with electric to prevent them from rooting under the permanent fence.
     
  6. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

    9,279
    728
    321
    Apr 11, 2011
    Tn
    Also, if you're considering pigs, don't get just one. A single pig is a depressed pig. Sometimes they wont even have the drive to eat if kept alone.
    I keep a free range flock of chickens "with" my pigs. They had their own quarters in the barn and decided to relocate themselves to the rafters in the pig pen. They follow our 10 pigs (1 sow, 1 boar and 8 piglets) around all day long. They're roaming a 14 acre pasture though. If they were confined to a pen, they'd have been eaten a long time ago, I'm sure. The pigs don't mind the chickens pushing their way into their slop bucket and the chickens seem to rely on them for predator protection (if a hawk comes looking for a chicken dinner, they all literally run under the pigs). Again, if they didn't have space to get away from each other, I'm sure they would've become a snack by now. So, it CAN work given the right circumstances and individual animals.
     
  7. MoonShadows

    MoonShadows The Jam Man

    1,162
    116
    178
    Jan 23, 2013
    Pocono Mtns
    My Coop
    Most of what was said here about "pigs" is true, but the KuneKune is a very unique pig. They have a personality very different from "commercial" pigs and other breeds of swine. They are sweet, docile, affectionate, small-size pig. They follow you around like a puppy. They get along wonderful with other animals (horses, dogs, cats and chickens) and seem to just fit right into their surroundings. They have a great temperament and are extremely easy to handle due to their gentleness and their being so easy going. Therefore, making them ideal for first time pig owners. They are the only pigs that are true grazers. They are not harsh on land but, live from the land. KuneKunes love fresh fruits and veggies. They are not a meat eater. However, since they are grazers, they need room; no more than 5-6 per acre of land, and yes you need to have a least two of them. Kunes are not ones to roam or test fencing. They stay close to your home and patiently await your arrival outside for a visit. You can do fencing very inexpensively for a kune.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2016

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by