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Layer feed showdown. Dumor vs. Layena vs. Nutrena

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by yeshuaisiam, Jan 13, 2016.

  1. yeshuaisiam

    yeshuaisiam Out Of The Brooder

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    I'd like to have a showdown on feed types. We run a small hatchery and easily go through more than a bag of feed per day. Here's the scoop.

    We have used Dumor
    We have not used Layena
    We have not used Nutrina

    A) Dumor as we "hear" is a pretty good feed. MY experience is that it is OK. It is rated 4/5 at Tractor Supply. I've heard a RUMOR that it is made by Purina Layena (and packaged for Tractor Supply). Of course, this is just something I read and do NOT have verification if in fact it is true. Our results are OK with Dumor thus far. Our feathers are not great but not entirely bad either. We sometimes have hens pick feathers off others but I don't think it really has to do with feed. The fresh layers are shiny, the older ones not so much. Energy levels seem OK on Dumor. Does ANYBODY know for a FACT if Purina makes Dumor? If so, that would pretty much conclude that Dumor is a generic Purina and there is not much sense in buying Purina for an extra $2 per bag. THIS IS the cheapest option of the 3.

    B) Purina Layena is made by (of course) Purina which is one of the largest suppliers of animal feed around. Being a brand name, it will probably be pretty consistent feed. Everything I read about Layena seems pretty good except the occasional "My chickens turn their beaks up at it".

    (The ingredients list and the tag percent contents are very close between Dumor and Layena.)

    C) Nutrena Naturewise Layer feed is newer to me. It seems to have probiotics in the feed which seems good. I do not have experience with Nutrina.

    Costs:

    Tractor Supply Dumor: $12.99 bag 50 pounds
    Purina Layena: $14.99 bag 50 pounds
    Nutrena Naturewise: $14.99 bag 50 pounds

    Again, I go through 1 bag a day. $2 extra adds up on other brands.

    The questions I'd have are the following:

    1) Is Dumor verified to be made by Purina and packaged for Tractor Supply?
    2) Does anybody have ACTUAL EXPERIENCE when switching from one feed type to another of egg production increase? (I'm talking the chickens were laying well, then it got better. Not situations where when you switched the chickens stopped laying, or winter was coming, or they went into moult, or any other funky complications - but rather a situation where they were doing good, then you got a 25% egg increase or decrease when switching.)

    3) Does anybody have ACTUAL EXPERIENCE of chickens eating/consuming less feed of one type than another yet still producing the same? (more vitamins/probiotics etc.)

    I'm trying to be 100% bottom line here. Looking for maximum egg production and maximum health with one of these feed types. I believe all of them to be good feeds. We supply people with chicks who just want to put some in their suburban backyard. I really want to have a great supply of babies for great homes.

    I know some of you are on certain types of feed and like them. That's great! I'm really looking for people to respond who have seen actual real results when switching between brands and their experiences with them. Especially who have done this through time and have a lot of experience with chickens!
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2016
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Dumor is a TSC brand and yes it is made by the same company (Land O' Lakes) as Purina. When there is a recall, it affects Purina, Dumor and Mazuri.
    That doesn't mean they are the same feed. There are many different recipes. In fact, even Purina will change their recipe from time to time as will almost all manufacturers.
    I used to use Dumor a lot because it was so much cheaper than Purina. I then joined a Co-op and got feed much cheaper with better variety of choices. The co-op is kaput now so I started shopping at Farm&Home across the road from TSC and am now mostly buying Nutrena but sometimes Purina.
    I know one of the nutritionists at Purina and I do believe it is a quality product.
    I asked him once about the fines left behind when feeding both crumbles and pellets. Having programmed and installed equipment at feed mills, I know that all the vitamins, minerals and added amino acids go in as powders. Therefor I know that those goodies are in the fines. He told me they take that into consideration when they formulate and put extras in to make up for that lost in the fines.

    I really don't think you are going to find a recordable difference in consumption or results regardless of the brand. They all base their recipes on the same science.
    The way I've cut my feed bill is by fermenting feed. There is so much less waste that I use about 1/3 less feed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2016
  3. yeshuaisiam

    yeshuaisiam Out Of The Brooder

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    Wow, if you do not mind to share with me PM (or a link) on you fermenting feed. I am very interested. My feed bill is $$$$.

    Thank you!
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I added something about purina in my post.

    This is the definitive thread on FF
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/645057/fermented-feeds-anyone-using-them

    A lot of it was summarized here by @Tikkijane
    https://tikktok.wordpress.com/category/chickens-2/

    Several people attribute the savings to 'improved nutrition'.
    However, I think the savings come from much less waste. All the fines are bound up in the ferment. That in itself improves the nutrition because all the added ingredients aren't lost.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Fermenting hands down. In addition to the fines being retained, fermenting turns regular feed into a super-food which = less feed needed. It's dropped my feed bill by 2/3, easily.
     
  6. yeshuaisiam

    yeshuaisiam Out Of The Brooder

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    Can fermenting be sped up by using a sourdough starter? (Like the kind you make and feed daily?) That way there is an active yeast sourdough "mature" already and added to the feed?
     
  7. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    That has been hashed over at length in the first link I gave you.
    Most say that it doesn't help and is unnecessary.
    I do use a starter though.
    I once did a test. I started three 5 gallon buckets the same day. I used Gro2Max powder in one, plain kefir in another and used nothing but water in the third. There was very little difference in the results but I felt better knowing what yeasts and bacteria were populating the feed.
     
  8. yeshuaisiam

    yeshuaisiam Out Of The Brooder

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    Awesome. What type of starter do you use?
     

  9. X2. Eventually, though, it all evens out anyhow. [​IMG]
     
  10. yeshuaisiam

    yeshuaisiam Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay, so now we have had great results with the fermented feed. Our usage is down about 30%. My next question many be tougher. Does it really matter which brand we start fermenting.

    Here's the reason.

    We can get Dumor at $12.99 a bag for layer pellets.
    We can also go to a local feed mill that sells a 16% pellet for $9.99 a bag.

    Both seem to have close ingredients. Both have same calcium. Tags are similar.

    So I know this is an impossible question (since we have a great lay rate with Dumor) but does fermenting feeds seem to "equalize" the smaller/cheaper brands?

    Thank you!
     

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