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Laying together but only every second day.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by mwat, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. mwat

    mwat Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 16, 2013
    Hi Everyone,

    I was just wondering...our two Bantams have been laying on alternate days from each other and now they have changed to both laying on the same day. So we get two eggs every second day. Does this mean they are getting to lay everyday? (it's the start of spring here at the moment and is their first season laying)

    Is it normal for bantams only lay once every second day or is there something we can do to encourage more egg production?

    I am loving having a chooks and are starting to feel a little addicted :p They are just so interesting!

    Also can anyone recommend another small breed for our little back yard? We would love some more Bantams but can't get any pullets at the moment.

    Thanks for any help!
     
  2. foreverlearning

    foreverlearning Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not all breeds lay everyday. When starting out, strong egg layers usually miss days between than start to lay almost everyday (have to have a break every now and then). Knowing the breed would help in knowing if they are meant to be strong layers.
     
  3. mwat

    mwat Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 16, 2013
    They are both Pekin Bantams [​IMG] I've heard they don't lay in Winter but they started about a month or two ago, during winter...we were surprised they were even laying really.
     
  4. foreverlearning

    foreverlearning Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well still being new to laying and giving you an egg every other day is a good sign of a strong layer. There are mixed reviews on the breed, some say lots of eggs, some say poor layer. Most do say they tend to have more problems with lice than other breeds. I would venture to say you will get more eggs more often soon, but if they reduce egg production dust for lice. Remember near late summer to early winter is the time for their juvenile molt and you will get less eggs there but it's nothing to worry about and giving them more protein then helps reduce the loss in eggs.
     
  5. mwat

    mwat Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks foreverlearning! That was so helpful. I clean out their coop every week and dust under their nests and wings as a part of the clean up and haven't seen any yet.
    I will keep an eye out for them malting. There are often a few feathers around but I'm not sure if that is malting. Do they have that malt every year? Or do they just start once they've had their first laying season?

    Sorry about the 20 questions! Thanks for your help :-D
     
  6. foreverlearning

    foreverlearning Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Every birds molt is different, but the most common are right around laying age and after 18 months it is once a year between late summer and early winter depending on the climate. Some girls, you will notice a lot of feathers on the ground but barley notice any difference in the girl (except less fluffy feathers near the vent). Others will have what they call a hard molt and have naked neck, chest, vent, and sometimes back areas.

    Anytime you see bald spots or a lot of feathers on the ground just check for external parasites or feather pickers, once you rule out both you know for sure there is a molt and increase protein. They do eat feathers if they can't get enough protein during a hard molt.

    While light molts seem to grow back quickly, hard molts take several months for your girls to regrow everything but the stall time for eggs is about the same for both. Asking questions is the only you will ever get any answers, it is better to know.
     

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