Leg injury

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by nan4848, Jul 29, 2013.

  1. nan4848

    nan4848 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2011
    Des Moines, IA
    I have a 2 yr old New Hampshire with a possible leg injury? I found her just sitting in the yard. When I got near her she stood up and walked a step, but tried running and fell down. I examined her leg (right leg) and foot and can not find any outward signs of injuries and nothing seems to be broken and her foot looks good. Nothing outwardly appears to be wrong as far as illness. She eats, drinks and laid an egg.
    She can stand and walk slowly short distances.

    I isolated her just to keep her confined. I felt she probably would not be able to get on the roost, and wasn't sure if the 5 other hens would pick on her. I plan on keeping her in isolation until I see some sign of improvement.

    I'm wondering if someone else has had experience with this, or ideas as to what else I can check to determine the problem? Am I doing the right thing? A veterinarian is not an option.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble Premium Member

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    You did the right thing by isolating her and restricting her movement, this will give time for the injury to heal...not walking /running around causing more severe injury. Ensure she has feed and water while confined. You can purchase vitamin B complex tablets at a pharmacy and crush a few into powder, then sprinkle it on top of her feed to eat. The vitamin B complex might help speed up recovery. Continue this for 5 days while she's caged. Then release her to see if she walks normal. If not, recage her and repeat the vitamin B complex treatment. Like before, release her after 5 days and see if she's walking normal. If not, recage her, but stop the vitamin B complex. With leg injuries, it takes time for them to heal. It could be a few days, a couple of weeks, months, or never. If after a couple of months and she's not healed, it then becomes a quality of life issue. Patience and TIME is the key for healing this type of injury.
    My experience is that hens usually recover nicely from leg injuries, roosters not so well. Ensure roosts are low enough in the coops especially for heavier breed birds and anything in the coop/pen or yard that's high up, lower or remove whatever it is.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013
  3. nan4848

    nan4848 Chillin' With My Peeps

    82
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    Apr 15, 2011
    Des Moines, IA
    Thanks Dawg, I do have some vitamin B complex and will start this. I had a feeling this would take time. I'm just encouraged she can stand.
     

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