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Leghorn eggs size

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by nirvanamike06, Feb 27, 2017.

  1. nirvanamike06

    nirvanamike06 Out Of The Brooder

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    My leghorns have been laying for about a month now and I get some eggs that are massive and alot of eggs that I would say are large to medium eggs. I was wondering if over time they will eventually all get to the jumbo size? They started out laying the size of quail eggs so they have gotten bigger but I figured by now they would be close to a uniform size. I've got 36 hens and get about 3 or 4 jumbo eggs a day.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2017
  2. flytie

    flytie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    New layers won't normally lay constant egg sizes for a while. Just like when other animals begin to produce eggs (menstrual cycle and all), things don't always start out smoothly. Another thing is that, while leghorns are known for medium to large eggs, they don't typically lay anything jumbo. For eggs like that you might consider birds like the Jersey Giant, that don't lay as often but tend to lay large (and sometimes multiple-yolked!) eggs. It also could depend on where you got the birds from and their parentage: genetics play a role in egg size and in how quickly the birds would "even out" their laying, persay [​IMG]




    I'll just be here lurking in threads, but if anyone else could comment it would probably be a lot more credible and/or understandable than whatever I say [​IMG]
     
  3. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Chicken Obsessed

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    Given that you are getting some very large eggs now, I'd guess that your flock are going to be giving you large eggs! However, don't expect to look in your egg box and see a bunch of eggs that are all the same size and shape! Those kind of eggs come from a store, and only look that way b/c they are graded, and anything that does not fit the standard does not get into the box! Home grown eggs are distinctive, even to the point where many flock owners can look at a specific egg and know exactly which hen laid it. You won't have quite that skill, since your leghorns are all the same color, and they all lay white eggs! But, you will find that particular hens will lay eggs that you can identify!

    In the second laying season, eggs will be much larger than they are the first season.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. nirvanamike06

    nirvanamike06 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the replies I tried to search but I couldn't find any conclusive answers on if they would get bigger or not.

    I'm gonna try and sell some eggs and it'd be nice to have more of the jumbo ones. I've been giving most of them away for cartons on a bring me 2 and I'll fill one up for you. I worked a deal out for 8 dozen for a bag of feed at the feed store so im hoping to be able to see if I can get close to breaking even on chicken costs.
     
  5. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't have leghorns now but the ones I had previously, laid eggs in the large, perhaps some extra large ones. Each year a hen lays, her eggs usually go up in size so my guess is jumbo eggs mostly come from hens their second year. If you really want to have the larger eggs you would probably be better off getting sex links. It seems the brown and buff sex links lay larger eggs than the black sex links by just a bit but perhaps that is only with the ones I am familiar with. Most of the jumbo eggs I've seen have come from golden comets.
     
  6. beckycrouch5115

    beckycrouch5115 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm not used to the Leghorns. I own all RIR and one lonely Leghorn. Do they normally lay good? I haven't gotten an egg from Leghorn in months! MONTHS!! She's beautiful, probably the prettiest one in my bunch. She may be chicken dinner if she don't get busy soon! [​IMG]
     
  7. ejcrist

    ejcrist Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here's some quantitative info that might help you figure out what sizes they'll lay...https://livestockconservancy.org/images/uploads/docs/ALBCchicken_assessment-2.pdf

    I have a bunch of breeds and Leghorns are one of them. I have hatchery and SOP Light Brown Leghorns. The hatchery birds lay very large eggs and always have - the biggest of all my birds. I wouldn't worry too much about filling a carton with jumbos, and I certainly wouldn't trade a dozen eggs for a carton to keep. A brand new carton from the suppliers is $0.40 ea at the most but a dozen eggs, even the cheapest (no pun intended) is at least a buck. Plus your eggs are fresh, like really fresh, which more than makes up for size. I sell a dozen for $4.00 here in Phoenix, AZ and I can't keep 'em in my fridge. If you live in a rural area you'd probably get a less of course but even there I'm sure there are people that don't grow their own. Part of what makes your eggs special is the fact they are all different which indicates they are home-grown and likely a lot fresher than anything you can get in the store. Don't be bashful about asking more for them because it costs money to raise and feed those birds. Customers can't expect you to eat those costs. And if they do they don't have to buy. That's my take anyway.
     
  8. nirvanamike06

    nirvanamike06 Out Of The Brooder

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    Out of 36 hens the fewest eggs I've got since they all started laying was 28 eggs. I've had a couple days where I got 36 eggs.

    Yea I'd like to start selling eggs on Craigslist but I'm in the process of moving so I hate to start where im at now and then move.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2017
  9. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Leghorns are usually excellent layers but are a little more flighty than I care for. How old is your leghorn? Are your other hens laying? Could she be laying in a place where you're not finding the eggs?
    Is her comb a bright red or paler. If she is coming off a molt it might take her a while to get back into laying. If that is the case you can help get back to laying mode by offering a higher protein food than laying mash or giving high protein treats. Often I toss mine handfuls of cat or dog kibble as treats when they're molting.
     

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