Leghorns vs Cornish Cross?

laurenjane85

In the Brooder
May 13, 2016
14
1
34
Hi all!
About 2 months (10 weeks?) ago I bought several chicks from Tractor Supply (along with several from local feed stores), and while I thought I was buying Leghorns, I'm thinking maybe they're actually Cornish Cross chickens. At the TSC where I got them, it didn't seem like the staff really knew the difference between the breeds, and I was googling each one while there to see which were layers vs broilers. Anyway, the birds in question grew WAY faster than the other chicks purchased at the same time, and in my eyes, are looking more like broilers than layers. If I had to guess, I'd say they're 1.5 to 2x the weight of their buddies (Red Sex-Links, Silver Laced Wyandottes, Ameracaunas...). They are bigger than my little ~1yr old RSL hen, and nearly as big as my other 1 & 2yr old layers. I'm only guessing they're the Cornish Cross because that's the only other white breed I see on the TSC website. Unfortunately, I don't have pictures of the big kids next to the "normal" ones, but I've attached a couple photos of one of the big kids and a photo of my ~1yr Appenzeller Barthuhner hen next to the same fence. I'm pretty sure this one is a cockerel, as the comb is larger than on the other two, but they're all similar in size.
Also, I have read that the meat birds tend to develop leg problems if not butchered by a certain age, and I have noticed that this kid especially is starting to walk funny and lying down to eat. I've started limiting their feed a bit to try to slow them down , but should I do anything differently, or just get them butchered sooner rather than later? (What is the ideal age?)
Thanks in advance!
Leghorn1.png Leghorn3.png Betty.png
 

Pork Pie

Flockwit
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Jan 30, 2015
58,322
242,715
1,697
Somewhere between 6-8 weeks is the time I usually butcher broilers, but I don't limit their feed. The sooner they reach a decent size, the sooner you can get rid of them.
 

Kyanite

Loving Life!
May 27, 2016
442
134
157
SE Idaho
Yes, I agree that's a cornish x. Sorry.
I actually lodged a complaint at my TSC because I was so tired of seeing bins of chicks with no labels and staff who clearly knew nothing about the breeds, because this is exactly what happens.
 

laurenjane85

In the Brooder
May 13, 2016
14
1
34
Yes, I agree that's a cornish x. Sorry.
I actually lodged a complaint at my TSC because I was so tired of seeing bins of chicks with no labels and staff who clearly knew nothing about the breeds, because this is exactly what happens.

I understand that! I went in knowing they probably wouldn't have a clue. I stood there with the chicks and googled each breed before I chose, cause I knew the staff probably wouldn't be able to answer questions. That's why I remember specifically asking for Leghorns and NOT the Cornish X, cause I didn't want broilers, and I'd read somewhere (probably here) about broilers developing leg problems if they're allowed to get too big, and I just didn't want to deal with that. But I'm no chicken expert, and I certainly can't tell one yellow chick apart from another yellow chick...
 

UncommonOpossum

In the Brooder
Jul 12, 2017
9
3
19
Alabama
I've been assuming that my two pudgy hens were just very fat leghorns but more and more I'm coming around to the idea that they sold me a couple of Cornish cross chicks in my white leghorns. I'm a little disappointed because of the 9 bitties I bought, 5 were leghorn roosters, 2 were Cornish cross and the last is what I'm understanding to be a female legorn.

There goes my dreams of an abundance of leghorn eggs
 

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