Lethargic Cochin Care

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chasingsunshine, Sep 30, 2014.

  1. chasingsunshine

    chasingsunshine Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 16, 2014
    Washington
    One of my 13 week old cochins hasn't been herself for a few weeks. When we got the pullets at 4 weeks she was the most afraid of humans, the biggest (or at least fluffiest) and most outspoken about issues like being picked up. Lately she's been quieter, doesn't fight being picked up, and also is now the smallest of the coop. She seems to sit around more than the others and moves slowly, and I noticed a few days ago that her butt feathers were poopy. I've self-diagnosed her with worms (there are no vets nearby and my work schedule wouldn't allow me to bring her to one until the weekend) and ordered a de-wormer online. Is there anything I can do to help her right now? Yesterday I gave her a bath to get the poop off and have her living in confinement inside. She's eating her normal feed, her water has ACV in it, and this morning I gave her some garlic/yogurt/oatmeal treat which she ate right up. I just feel so guilty that I didn't try to figure out what was wrong with her when she first started acting off.
     
  2. Frizzlett98

    Frizzlett98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 22, 2014
    Southwest Virginia
    You could treat her for Coccidiosis. When mine had it, their bottoms were a mess. What does her poop look like?
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2014
  3. chasingsunshine

    chasingsunshine Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 16, 2014
    Washington
    Her poop seems somewhat normal, but really watery. There's still a solid part to it that doesn't look too different than the poop from the healthy chickens, but you can see that the bedding around and under the poop has absorbed a bit of water. Plus, wet butt feathers.
     
  4. Frizzlett98

    Frizzlett98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 22, 2014
    Southwest Virginia
    Either Cocci or worms. Go ahead and treat for both.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Cocci is the most common problem at this age. Treat all chickens with Corid or amprollium for 5-7 days. After Corid, give several day's of probiotics and vitamins in the water. Then I would worm tham all with fenbendazole or SafeGuard liquid goat wormer 1/4-1/2 ml orally, and repeat in 10 days.
     

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