Light source and how much for quail?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by BigRedRoo, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. BigRedRoo

    BigRedRoo Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 6, 2013
    Ontario, Canada
    Ok so Im prity new to quail; have done allot of reaserch but cannot find the affects of too much light in the quail hutch. Now my problem is this, its -15*c today as the high and last night was the same so the heat lights have been on for 24hrs and will probably need to stay on 24hrs a day for the rest of the winter, so they dont freeze to death. My worry is that like chickens too much light stiumlation can cause ill effects on overall health. (this is not my opinon it has scientific warnt so please dont overload the forum with chicken light knowledge. this is a question for quail) the lights are 125watt heat lamp X2 at either end of the 6ft hutch. I have put brush debris along the back to give entertainment and to allow escaping from pekish hens, so thier is dark corners to hide from the light. Just want healthy happy live stock is all any thoughts?
    Even opions on the subject would be nice but please if it is an opion not a fact you state it as such, I hate the banter about non sense that goes on.
     
  2. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Same as chickens more or less. Can cause health problems but definitely shortens the life cycle of the birds by quite a bit. A good alternative would be to to run one light 14-16 hours a day and then at night run a ceramic heating element in the other heat lamp (looks like a light bulb but just puts out heat no light).
     
  3. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    Minus 5 degrees C is about 5 degrees F. This being said, quail can handle temps lower than this and survive as long as they are not young, old or sick. It seems cold to you, and yes it is. I am sure they don't like this temp, but they can survive without heat.

    So you might consider only using the lights when it gets to minus 25 C or more. I don't turn on heat for my birds until around this temp of -25C.

    Now all this being said, if you feel that you must use heat lamps, use infra-red lamps. Infra-red does not disturb sleeping patterns. Yes, the birds bodies know that there is light and it may stimulate laying, but it still allows them to sleep thru the night. It is a healing light and stimulates circulation, it is deeply penetrating and does all sorts of other things to the body for health. Infra-red is used in Europe in sauna's for arthritis patients. It is a wonderful light. And it will not over stimulate the birds. It actually has the opposite effect. Just as you raise babies in the brooders with a red lamp for 6 weeks, you can use this infra-red on your adults for extended periods if you need to.

    Make sure the bulb is infra-red. Not just any red bulb will do.

    Good luck and stay warm!
     
  4. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    And now that I am thinking about it, you might try ceramic lighting. It is used in reptile environments. I bought a ceramic bulb last year, but I have never used it. They emit no light at all. Just a ceramic bulb that heats up and the light dome distributes the heat. Mine is a 75 watt. I did plug it in once to see how it worked, and it did let out heat. But for my set ups, I really need higher wattage bulbs.

    Anyway, if you are concerned about any light, you might do some research here on line into 150 or more wattage ceramic bulbs. You will need a brooder dome with a ceramic element to use with these bulbs. :)
     

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