Lighting in coop?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by MyShunshyn, May 24, 2011.

  1. MyShunshyn

    MyShunshyn Chillin' With My Peeps

    230
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    Jan 16, 2011
    Sperrassoville, OK
    I know that most people only have a heat lamp or 100 watt bulb in the coop for winter when it is very cold but I am wondering if just a simple, low wattage RED bulb would be ok in the coop for a source of low light in the coop at night? My 5 week olds are not roosting yet and they either don't go into the coop at night by themselves or they all crowd around the windows in the door when we turn the light off.

    Basically I am just asking if anyone has a light on in the coop all the time?
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    No, chickens need their rest and the darkness provides it. I want them to sleep and sleep well.

    The work lights we have are for us, to see during the dark winter mornings and dark evenings, so we can water, or check on things.
    Heating during the winter is really, really, tough to do, to say nothing of the horrendous expense.
     
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Roosting.

    Roosting is a learned skill and preference. Some breeds take to it quickly while others take almost 5 months to master it. Either way, nature has programmed the chicken to retire before darkness sets in completely. At dusk, as the daylight begins to fail, the chickens will begin preparations for the night. Eventually, that will mean settling onto their roost, in the assigned seats, of course.

    This takes a little time and maturity. But chicks figure this all out on their own or by watching flock mates. When they first come out of a 24/7 lit brooder, they haven't figured out day and night yet. But, they are fast learners. By 7 or 8 pm, they will begin to settle in for the night all on their own. Sometimes on the roost, and sometimes still huddled on the floor.
     
  4. MyShunshyn

    MyShunshyn Chillin' With My Peeps

    230
    3
    101
    Jan 16, 2011
    Sperrassoville, OK
    Fred's Hens :

    Roosting.

    Roosting is a learned skill and preference. Some breeds take to it quickly while others take almost 5 months to master it. Either way, nature has programmed the chicken to retire before darkness sets in completely. At dusk, as the daylight begins to fail, the chickens will begin preparations for the night. Eventually, that will mean settling onto their roost, in the assigned seats, of course.

    This takes a little time and maturity. But chicks figure this all out on their own or by watching flock mates. When they first come out of a 24/7 lit brooder, they haven't figured out day and night yet. But, they are fast learners. By 7 or 8 pm, they will begin to settle in for the night all on their own. Sometimes on the roost, and sometimes still huddled on the floor.

    Well I am not so much concerned about the roosting as I am about that the one time we left the light off they didn't go into the coop at night....just huddled outside the door and we had to put them in, which I have read is kinda normal....but honestly it is DH who is worried about the light.​
     
  5. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    Quote:I have had a light on my coop 24/7 since I've had chickens (7-8 years) It used to be a 60 watt incandescent bulb, but changed over to a 13 watt compact florescent a few years ago. A lot of people have posted that their chickens won't go into a dark coop. I have not had any problems with pecking or sleeping etc. with the light.

    Imp
     

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