lizard feeder?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by broody rooster, May 8, 2017.

  1. broody rooster

    broody rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey everyone its been awhile, i was curious has anyone ever done a lizard feeder before? i have a pair of green anoles that have lived on my front porch for the past couple of years( there was a 2nd male but he was evicted shortly after maturing, i believe he was most likely the son of the dominant male) and i thought it would be a cool little project to do and i breed my own mealworms so the food would be easy but i want something visible to both me and the lizard as well as accessible to the lizard but in a way the mealworms cant escape, any ideas comments or input is appreciated. [​IMG]
     
  2. Bluegrassmama

    Bluegrassmama Out Of The Brooder

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    My son has a leopard gecko and our local pet store has a mealworm feeder that is supposed to not allow them to escape. I don't know how well it works but you could check it out. Is it very hard to breed your own mealworms? It would save us from constantly buying them and crickets.
     
  3. ILuvMyFlock

    ILuvMyFlock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    On the Farm
    Ever consider breeding dubia roaches?
     
  4. broody rooster

    broody rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    meal worms are too easy to breed, ive got them in a large bin full of oatmeal or any other kind of grain like that and just give them something for moisture like a piece of carrot or apple and just some patience. im trying dubias right now but apparentlt im not keeping it warm enough to breed them ive got 2 adult males and 2 adult females and various nymphs and so far not a single baby has been produced, any tips on what im doing wrong? ive got 3 leopard geckos, a brown anole, a gold dust day gecko, a mexican red knee tarantula , a tiny red rump tarantula, various fish and an axolotl.
     
  5. ILuvMyFlock

    ILuvMyFlock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    On the Farm
    Well I recommend having more females and just a few males. The humidity needs to be somewhat high like, I use water crystals, and I mist the tank daily. Also I use a blue light for temps, they need higher temps to facilitate breeding. Around 90 temps is a start for breeding, but don't go too much higher than that. Soon they will be breeding rapidly trust me. Make sure to give them some feed mix along with sweet things like baby carrots, fruits, and they can even eat veggies it helps gut load them.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2017

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