NHMountainMan

Free Ranging
Feb 25, 2019
935
3,692
502
New Hampshire
My Coop
do you think the electric fence would work?
I use electric poultry netting. I know it's stopped coyote and black bear as I've gotten them on camera. (I Cait the fence with bacon). A bobcat could easily jump the fence (mine is 4'). But so far, I've only seen tracks outside the fence. But electricity isn't a physical barrier - it's a mental barrier. I've seen the cat on other cameras on our land so I know he's around. So far - the fence and a very secure run have kept my flock safe.
@ColtHandorf and @PirateGirl are right about chicken wire. The holes are too large and the wire itself is easily broken. The recommendation most give is for 1/2" hardware cloth.
Your don't have a location in your profile. You must be pretty far north to see lynx. We're in NH and only recently have we seen lynx return. They are so dependant on snowshoe hare population. We've seen a lot more rabbits and started seeing lynx the past few winters. Beautiful animals. But I'm sure you're not feeling that after losing your birds.
 

ColtHandorf

Crowing
Feb 19, 2019
2,652
3,669
357
Klondike, Texas
what would a better option be? this is my first flock
People always sound really obnoxious/rude/pretentious when they answer this question so if I come across that way, I am soooo sorry. Chicken wire is great for keeping chickens in, but literally anything can get through it. Some things are small and just climb/walk through like mice, weasels, and snakes. Some things climb over it, like mink, raccoons, or opossums. And some things can just go straight through it by tearing/breaking the wire like dogs, bobcats/lynx, coyotes, foxes, and bears.

Me personally, I use welded wire in the area that I am in, but in no way is that secure. Usually the best option is 1/4"x1/4" hardware cloth in a fully enclosed run so that the chickens are completely safe from any predators. Additionally adding a hot wire/electric fence can be helpful in deterring the most tenacious of predators.

If you go through the coop section of the forum you'll see lots of really good ideas for secure coops with or without no-dig aprons to prevent predators from digging under the wire. Of course everyone has an individual set-up that works for them, but if you have a lynx preying on your birds, then you're probably not in a quiet suburban neighborhood where rats and hawks are probably the worst things you have to watch out for.
 

NovaChooks

Chirping
Jun 24, 2019
92
132
91
I use electric poultry netting. I know it's stopped coyote and black bear as I've gotten them on camera. (I Cait the fence with bacon). A bobcat could easily jump the fence (mine is 4'). But so far, I've only seen tracks outside the fence. But electricity isn't a physical barrier - it's a mental barrier. I've seen the cat on other cameras on our land so I know he's around. So far - the fence and a very secure run have kept my flock safe.
@ColtHandorf and @PirateGirl are right about chicken wire. The holes are too large and the wire itself is easily broken. The recommendation most give is for 1/2" hardware cloth.
Your don't have a location in your profile. You must be pretty far north to see lynx. We're in NH and only recently have we seen lynx return. They are so dependant on snowshoe hare population. We've seen a lot more rabbits and started seeing lynx the past few winters. Beautiful animals. But I'm sure you're not feeling that after losing your birds.
they are still beautiful. its not their fault they're hungry and I happen to have fat, feathery tree potatoes hanging around.
I live in Nova Scotia, Canada. we have lots of rabbit, pheasant, etc. so loads for the cats to eat but its the first time I've ever seen one, and it's something to talk about if you see a predator like that around here. not common.

my run has the top wired with the chicken wire, too. I figured it would keep the eagles and ravens out.

still crossing my fingers the lynx will move on and not bother with the wire, but if I see it again i'll have to beef up security
 

NovaChooks

Chirping
Jun 24, 2019
92
132
91
People always sound really obnoxious/rude/pretentious when they answer this question so if I come across that way, I am soooo sorry. Chicken wire is great for keeping chickens in, but literally anything can get through it. Some things are small and just climb/walk through like mice, weasels, and snakes. Some things climb over it, like mink, raccoons, or opossums. And some things can just go straight through it by tearing/breaking the wire like dogs, bobcats/lynx, coyotes, foxes, and bears.

Me personally, I use welded wire in the area that I am in, but in no way is that secure. Usually the best option is 1/4"x1/4" hardware cloth in a fully enclosed run so that the chickens are completely safe from any predators. Additionally adding a hot wire/electric fence can be helpful in deterring the most tenacious of predators.

If you go through the coop section of the forum you'll see lots of really good ideas for secure coops with or without no-dig aprons to prevent predators from digging under the wire. Of course everyone has an individual set-up that works for them, but if you have a lynx preying on your birds, then you're probably not in a quiet suburban neighborhood where rats and hawks are probably the worst things you have to watch out for.
lynx aren't supposed to be in my area, but obviously they are! other than that we just have the ordinary stuff. racoons, foxes, hawks and eagles etc.
 

NHMountainMan

Free Ranging
Feb 25, 2019
935
3,692
502
New Hampshire
My Coop
Until this year, my biggest challenge was keeping bears away from my beehives and deer, moose and gd porcupine out of my gardens and orchard. This year I added chickens and the need to up my game. Nothing stops a moose - they're so big they walk through everything and so dumb that they don't learn from the shock. Porcupine (what I call $500 vet bills) have got me running around like Elmer Fudd (shhh.be vewy vewy quiet, I'm huntin' porky)

With the chickens, it seems like everything wants to eat them. Nocturnal, diurnal - doesn't matter. Something wants them.
 

NovaChooks

Chirping
Jun 24, 2019
92
132
91
Until this year, my biggest challenge was keeping bears away from my beehives and deer, moose and gd porcupine out of my gardens and orchard. This year I added chickens and the need to up my game. Nothing stops a moose - they're so big they walk through everything and so dumb that they don't learn from the shock. Porcupine (what I call $500 vet bills) have got me running around like Elmer Fudd (shhh.be vewy vewy quiet, I'm huntin' porky)

With the chickens, it seems like everything wants to eat them. Nocturnal, diurnal - doesn't matter. Something wants them.
They're easy, delicious pickings for all beasties.
 

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