Make up your mind already!

Xerocles

Songster
May 22, 2019
171
533
102
Clinton (piedmont) S.C.
Does anybody ( besides me, now) know how long it takes your chicken to decide to actually lay an egg? I have six EEs, about 22 weeks old. 1 started laying 3 days ago. The other five are still Moochers. But the one is now 3 for 3. (Yippee! Eggs!) I knew she was laying afternoons, but wanted some idea of times so I could figure when she would "hold it in" and convert to mornings. So today I kept an extra close eye on her. Just before 4:00 I noticed an extra urgency in her step. So I plopped down in the swing to watch (because I am retired and can use my time for silly things like this. THAT'S why). I left the main door of the coop open so I could see inside. First egg had been laid on the open floor of the coop. Second egg in a nest box. So I watched. None of my chickens EVER go inside the coop before roost time, before she started laying. So it was in the coop, out of the coop, in the coop, out of the coop for about 15 minutes. Then she went UNDER the nest boxes about four times, scratching out a couple good nest sites. Finally, into the nest box. Out, then in, then out, then in. Eventually she settled down, spent 20 minutes in the nest box. Popped out like nothing happened, and started scratching for food. I immediately went out to investigate and found my third small WARM blue green egg. From 4:00 until 5:15. Sure I know that will change when she gets more experience. Hop in, pop a squat, and back to scratching. But for now, while we're both new to this, it was fascinating to watch her decide what she wanted to do!
 

slordaz

hatchaholic
5 Years
Apr 15, 2015
3,456
6,393
602
Idaho
don't think there is any way to change their laying schedule and each hens could be different once they start laying it should be around the same time each day they are creatures of habit when it comes to that, and each hens clock might be different too. they usually lay between 4-6 months old and it takes 24-26 hours for the egg to get through the system to be layed so that is only thing that would change the time they lay or you'll get an oops or fart egg Those the sooner they get water in the morning after roosting the sooner I seem to hear the older girls egg song, might just be a coincidence though
 

slordaz

hatchaholic
5 Years
Apr 15, 2015
3,456
6,393
602
Idaho
I honestly didn't know chickens laid eggs so late in the day. I let mine roam around outside if I'm home in the afternoon, and now I'm wondering where they've hid some mystery eggs. Jealous you got to witness everything as it happened! Thanks for sharing!
mine were sqabbling as have a couple trying to go broody but have noticed they usually lay sometime before roosting with the exception of the occasional oops or fart egg from the roost, I never walk under the roost when chickens are on it they inevitably do one of those or poop while sleeping lol
 

BigBlueHen53

We will get through this... together!
Mar 5, 2019
16,785
62,101
1,167
SE Missouri, USA
I don't think they have a lot of control over it. I think they kinda feel one coming on, but have to wait til the egg is ready, their body is ready, the moon is in perfect alignment, the nest is comfy, and they're holding their mouth just right, lol. And if something startles them, they have to start all over!
 

Xerocles

Songster
May 22, 2019
171
533
102
Clinton (piedmont) S.C.
So she came out like nothing happened, no egg song?
No. I am SO bummed. My grandma (I stayed at her house more than I stayed home, just 100 yards from us) had chickens, and cows, and goats, and horses, regular Farm. Her chickens didn't have runs... Or coops. They were basically feral chickens. I don't remember if they had Predator problems. Honestly the only thing I remember ( this was in the 1950s) is the egg song. Would be in the house and the Egg song would start. Granny says George RUN and see where that chicken is in the yard. Then try to find her nest. Yes. Nest hunting was always a real Adventure. Of course, there were a lot of chickens. And only a few nests needed to be located to provide enough eggs for the extended family. And those not located? More chickens, to make more eggs.
BUT I SURE MISS THAT EGG SONG!:barnie
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom