Martial Arts

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by punk-a-doodle, Jun 22, 2011.

  1. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2011
    Anyone doing American Kenpo? Any other disciplines?

    I have a belt test coming up right quick, and I don't think I'm going to cut it this time. I can't seem to grasp the techniques this time around. It sucks mainly, because I let myself down this time. Going to give it my best shot though. What helps you prepare?
     
  2. Momagain1

    Momagain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 13, 2011
    Central IL
    I am in Taekwondo...
    when I test...I ONLY test when I mentally feel prepared...

    waste of money and time..and it usually only hurts my own self esteem...

    So, all I can say is unless you HAVE to test right now...I'd wait until you feel more confident..

    Unless again, you are always this way before a testing...
    my first testing I was like that and it took me over a year to test for my first belt...

    GL! Dont doubt yourself. Can you meet up w/anyone else who is testing the same rank and
    go through it together?
     
  3. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My husband is in the same class, and he is about where I am at level wise right now, but feels much more confident we can get everything down by the 9th than I do. It's really, really nice to have a practicing partner, but because we missed so many practices this time around for various reasons, there are some techniques we just haven't been able to even get the gist of as we work through them together. We'll be going in tomorrow early to go through the ones giving us the most trouble with our very helpful instructors, but hm, I'm liking your idea of asking to test next time honestly. That's the problem though, I have serious anxiety issues for any small change (Even completely positive change!), so I can't tell if I'm just wasting everyone's time by trying this time, or if I am balking as usual. I think I'd best be talking to the main instructor, he's an understanding guy and is the one who decides when we test (we don't get charged for testing at this studio, just the belt and certificate if you advance). Main problem to me is they tell us "the most important thing is to do something, to react", but I am totally a deer in headlights on a good day. [​IMG] Their pushing to react is helping me though, outside of class and just in everyday life, to not be so painfully hung up on every little thing mentally. That's one of the great things about martial arts I think, the philosophy and how much that can help just in the day to day.


    Thanks so much for the response! It helps so much just addressing it, honestly. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2011
  4. Avalon1984

    Avalon1984 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 22, 2010
    Muskegon
    I feel that sometimes trainers put too much pressure on their students. By all means you should be expected to do your best at a test but at the same time I feel that it is not a failure if you don’t make the cut. It is just a sport. I started out in Wado Ryu and AKS, tested up to brown belt (it is a different name and level in each style) and then I did Shotokan until blue belt, so I never really finished to black. I did so many tests here and there and you get used to it. Although you will be nervous at first, I think you will be fine within 5 minutes. You will look around and see other people make mistakes as well. It is not called an art for nothing. It takes much practice and eventually you’ll get it right [​IMG]
     
  5. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Avalon, it helps to be reminded that it is not the end of the world, and that it is more a matter of try, try again. In this case, it is more me putting too much pressure and stress on myself than the instructors. I do wish we could set up the tests ourselves though, even though I'd probably stay a white belt my whole life were that an option. XD. That is so neat that you've gotten to explore different styles. I haven't even heard of Shotokan, and will have to look it up. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2011
  6. Avalon1984

    Avalon1984 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 22, 2010
    Muskegon
    Quote:Now that's the mindset. Just like with horse back riding, martial arts should be considered a contious learning process. It would be false for people to think that once they achieve a certain rank, that they will always be at that "level" if that makes sense. You learn, you forget, you re-learn, you learn more, and so on. I have explored different styles to get a broad view of what is out there and learned that all styles are pretty much alike in their thinking. Some styles are more focused on hand techniques, others are into legs, or weapons, in-fighting or ground. I like to pick my favorite techniques from each style, which helps if you ever practice fighting. I have found that applying some Shotokan techniques while fighting in a Wado Ryu club really threw people off [​IMG]

    Don't pressure yourself to do a test if you don't feel that you are ready. After all, the belt is only there to hold up the uniform, whether it is white, green or black. You are an equally important part fo the dojo regardless of rank. I have never believed in ranks, only in learning.
     
  7. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks so much for the input guys. Husband and I did go in today to test. I was so worried the poor guy wouldn't be able to make it through, he works the night shift and was up for 24 hours by the end of the test! [​IMG] I could tell he was frustrated and tired when we went in, but he decided to work through it, started to relax, and did great. We did advance belt wise along with several other classmates, but what struck me is how calm I was this time around. I was completely okay if we ended up not. I'm finding it is really starting to help us both in life, as we both can put way too much pressure on ourselves and have unrealistic views of any perceived failure (however small), to stop avoiding situations where yeah, we might look silly or not pass something, and to start accepting that as reality. Instead of worrying myself sick about what I didn't get right during the test, I am encouraged to up my practicing and genuinely found it helpful to be able to start seeing myself where I can really improve. It definitely helps that our studio is run by someone who genuinely enjoys the art, and that all our instructors are encouraging, understanding, and patient. It really makes a world of difference in how you start to view life in a safe setting as opposed to a judgmental one. At the end, I definitely appreciated the reminder that the belts (we arrange them in L shapes at the end of tests) form the shape of stairs, and that belts are not destinations but part of the journey. I am so glad we decided to go, and that we have had the chance to find a place that holds values that are more true to life. [​IMG]
     
  8. catdaddy66

    catdaddy66 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 18, 2009
    Lugoff, SC
    I no longer practice my arts as I am an old geezer, But when I was in high school I began with wrestling. Then as a thirty year old took up Okinowan karate and ju jitsu for 3 years. I think of the lessons my sensei taught me every day, at work and home and try to live by them as much as I can. Avalon stated that senseis often put too much pressure on their students but I look at it as a challenge that I may or may not meet, and it's ok if I don't. If I don't meet that challenge then I have to continue to work on it until I do learn it. Then I need to KEEP learning it until "It" becomes second nature. A sword maker forges the sword with a thousand strikes of the hammer, then polishes/sharpens it with ten thousand strokes of the stone

    You have already learned more than 90% of everyone so you are in a very elite class of student. I always try to approach my art as a student, knowing that there is always something to learn. My sensei told me once that martial arts are only 25-30% of any culture's knowledge, which also involve the spiritual, social and intellectual.

    Congrats on your belt test success! Kenpo is one of the most advanced hand arts/ techniques in the world. If you want to see a master at work, watch the movie "The Perfect Weapon" with Jeff Speakman, who was once the head of the American Kenpo system. Awesome skills!!
     
  9. Sword

    Sword Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 27, 2010
    Mundelein
    Quote:My Hapkido teacher said that the idea that "Good people pass tests, bad people fail" is dumb and that tests are just a way of finding out what you know so you know what to study in the future. Maybe thinking about it that way will make it seem less intimidating?

    As for my martial arts history, I did Muay Thai and Jiu Jitsu for a few months, had to move across the country for school and did Choy Li Fut kung fu while I was there, moved back home and took up Hapkido at the college I was attending (I couldn't afford to sign up at the Muay Thai place again). The college doesn't have the Hapkido class during summer, so right now I'm doing SCA Heavy Fighting and a free karate class at the YMCA.
    I've also been sabre fencing for the past 4 or 5 years.
     
  10. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Catdaddy, I'll definitely check out that movie! Than you for sharing that bit of wisdom with me about forging a sword. I'm starting to realize just how important going through the material, and not just repeating the moves but thinking about and understanding how each moves works is, and how important it is to burn it into muscle memory. I have many hammer strikes left to go, but starting to see how the blade is becoming more formed than the lump I started with definitely made an impression.

    Sword that is so neat. I think it is really great when people can explore different disciplines! And sabre fencing...wow. I did a bit of traditional fencing when I was ten, and just loved it. I doubt I could even lift a sabre. XD
     

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