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Meat bird breeds

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Jennifer319, Aug 16, 2014.

  1. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Now that I have my own, I never eat chicken at a restaurant any more. At least that's a few less chickens on a broiler farm.
     
  2. TaraBellaBirds

    TaraBellaBirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not to hijack the OP thread but I know where everyone is coming from with the cost of buying meat birds. I will do the math after butcher as to cost per LB but last year I averaged about $10 a bird (birds averaged 4lbs each after process) from start to finish. It helps when you order your meaties with layers if you can, to offset shipping.

    All in all, cost is worth knowing what you are getting to me and my family.

    The plan for us is to start caponizing all our x-tra males that we hatch ourselves. This will end our dependency even on hatcheries!
     
  3. SJ

    SJ Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    When you start producing your own chicks you really cut costs. That why I keep a couple "working broodies" as they are better incubators than I am.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I as well as my parents ( Dad was a Veterinarian so we had a great advantage in genetic selection, nutrition, etc. ) have bred chickens for well over a half century. In our experience, breeding and hatching your own is NOT cost effective. I found this out several years ago when I did a TRUE cost analysis of my parents' as well as our flock costs and compared them to what I could buy the CornishX and Leghorn breeds for. This holds true to this day. Do your own all of the TRUE cost analysis and you will be surprised at the results. [​IMG]
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Bossroo, I agree with you. That holds if you are raising the primary breeds for meat and eggs. If you're working with some heritage breeds, it's much cheaper to keep a closed flock. That is, even if you could find birds of the breed you want to raise.
     
  6. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We bred some of the finest New Hampshire Reds one could ever hope for. However they did not come anywhere close to the CornishX or the Leghorns in production. AND ... they DID NOT pencil out in cost of production. Better than any barnyard mutts or so called " heritage" birds, but still ... no cigar.
     
  7. Sally_O

    Sally_O Out Of The Brooder

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    Can you share that post with me? I'd love to read it. This year we are tractoring our CX. But I'd like to free range next year if we can work out the fencing -- need to keep all my birds with my Great Pyrenees. Live way out in the country and predators can be a problem with true free ranging. Determined birds can get in and out with our electric fencing, but most stay in. Just will need a bigger area with CS in the mix.
     
  8. silky smooth

    silky smooth Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]Congratulations on the purchase and development of your new property.[​IMG]


    "No h.o.a", does not always mean that you can have chickens. there is a sheet on file in your city hall/ township office etc. that lists your property and it's zoning status, size, ownership, etc. Get a copy. Check your local ordinance! get a copy. Read carefully, highlight the section that tells you how many of what you can have. make a side note your intended max adult number date and sign. get a copy of the G.enerally A.ccepted A.gricultural M.anagement P.ractices for the care of farm animals. And a copy of the right to farm act. read everything carefully.


    I find that for a family of four that makes all of our own bread, and baked goods for the house and to sell, and barter with. that six Red Betty layers, producing seven dozen eggs a week. and before you ask, no, this is not normal. the normal formula is 1 chicken + 1 day = 1 egg( no i can't share my secret, since i don't know what it is!) give me enough to keep my family stocked. with some to sell. which covers the cost of their feed, with a little left over for an ice cream cone or two. but not much more. I cull my girls when they stop laying, the meat is slightly less tender, but still tasty, and the nutrients are there. it's something to think about.

    startup cost:
    Having had the occasion to calculate the start up cost, for a friends children. this is what i came up with. for everything you intend it will take on average 3-5 years for your birds to produce enough eggs and meat to cover startup costs. materials for their coop,emergency repair materials on hand (emergency shopping, in the middle of the night, usually is not an option. but, if you can wake someone out of bed it gets costly), vermin control, and this is assuming you have all the necessary building/repair tools. acceptable bedding, feeders, waterers, feed, feed storage containers. and cleanout tools. composter or other such place to dispose of wasted materials. emergency medical supplies for sick or injured birds, and a pre set up quarantine. along with a safe disposal plan for syringes, and needles. materials for a sand lot, if you don't want them to dig up your landscaping. grass reseeding, time. If you plan to hatch your own then there is the incubator and rocker, hatchling bin, heat lamps, chick feeders waterers you get the idea, bedding (which needs changed frequently once every 24-72 hrs) and all of this takes up space. and then the cost of the birds themselves.

    if you decide this is still something you need to do, we are all here in support! welcome to the flock.



    if i missed anything please feel free to add.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2015
  9. Jennifer319

    Jennifer319 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for all of your insight! I actually called the county and established my zone and what I was allowed per ordinance to have. Luckily we are agriculture preservation and per acre there is a set number of birds. I am not really near anyone which helps as I plan two pigs as well. I have let the neighbors know and since I like pretty and tidy I am planning to have animal enclosures for function and part of the landscape. I think this is a love endeavor and although I know my initial costs are far outweighing what I will get in food stock it's just something I really want to do. Time will tell I suppose! I will have many questions along the way so I am so appreciative of those who are doing it and doing it well. Thank you for you words it truly is helpful. Jennifer
     
  10. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Doesn't compute. That comes out to 2 eggs every day - per hen. [​IMG]
     

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