Miracle Babies

Caroline0615

Chirping
May 11, 2020
67
64
68
I’ve had an approximate 8 old hen laying on 3 eggs for the past 2-3 weeks. Today I come out to the pen to see she has abandoned those eggs for new ones. When I touched them they were freezing cold. I candles them and no movement. So I put them in my incubator really quick and I finally see movement. I don’t know how they are alive, but I wanted to share my story to you so that you will have hope if this ever happens to you. P.S. I DONT KNOW HOW LONG SHE WAS OFF THEM FOR
 

Anne02

Songster
Dec 23, 2020
456
3,654
216
Pennsylvania
I’ve had an approximate 8 old hen laying on 3 eggs for the past 2-3 weeks. Today I come out to the pen to see she has abandoned those eggs for new ones. When I touched them they were freezing cold. I candles them and no movement. So I put them in my incubator really quick and I finally see movement. I don’t know how they are alive, but I wanted to share my story to you so that you will have hope if this ever happens to you. P.S. I DONT KNOW HOW LONG SHE WAS OFF THEM FOR
That's amazing!! Keep me posted, I can't wait to see if they hatch.
 

ChocolateMouse

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Jul 29, 2013
5,603
17,852
707
Cleveland OH
What do you mean by that?

Many animals, incubated eggs, even people get chilled by the cold. It's very easy to mistake a baby animal for dead when they're really just hypothermic, and same with people. It's important to warm them up before you declare them dead because there's no pulse or biological functions in something that's very cold. It's like a living death.

Every very rare once in a while some hiker or something will get declared dead after getting brought in cold stiff and "come back to life" when brought up to room temperature.

This happens a lot in baby rabbits too.

So it's just a rule to live by that this post proves. If you find something very cold and you think it's dead, warm it up first. You never know if it might still be alive! In this case, fertile eggs. :)
 

Anne02

Songster
Dec 23, 2020
456
3,654
216
Pennsylvania
Many animals, incubated eggs, even people get chilled by the cold. It's very easy to mistake a baby animal for dead when they're really just hypothermic, and same with people. It's important to warm them up before you declare them dead because there's no pulse or biological functions in something that's very cold. It's like a living death.

Every very rare once in a while some hiker or something will get declared dead after getting brought in cold stiff and "come back to life" when brought up to room temperature.

This happens a lot in baby rabbits too.

So it's just a rule to live by that this post proves. If you find something very cold and you think it's dead, warm it up first. You never know if it might still be alive! In this case, fertile eggs. :)
I get it. But the eggs were already in the incubator so. . .
 

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