Misc questions about rebuilding my coop

saysfaa

Crowing
Jul 1, 2017
1,227
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281
Upper Midwest, USA
Metal lath might be less expensive than hardware cloth. And works better for some predator-proofing. I compared hardware cloth in 25' or shorter rolls of 2', 3', and 4' widths before prices jumped up so much; I haven't compared it lately. It is a lot harder to work with for the reasons that make it better (heavier, sharper, stiffer). It works very well for aprons and windows; not so much for eaves - at least not the way I did them with cutting to go around each rafter. I didn't try sides of runs.
 

3KillerBs

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Jul 10, 2009
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North Carolina Sandhills
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I'll probably just buy two 8'x4' metal panels for the roof. It should have enough room to overhang 1' all around. I made my list today and actually have most of the wood. I will have to replace one 8'x4' because one of my current ones is already flaking. I just need to buy a lot of misc things like hinges, latches, etc. The most expensive thing on my list is hardware cloth. I can buy some for the coop but a roll of 4'x50' which is what I would need for the run is about $129. I actually already have a pea vine trellis I use as the run. It's just not predator proof. Is there a cheaper alternative than hardware cloth? Electric fence?

Here is some info for you:

Here's how-to (and how not to), extend a roof by sistering the extension to the rafters: https://strousehomeinspections.com/blog/structural-roof-extensions.html

And here is how to use lookouts to extend the roof at right-angles to the rafters: https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...e-overhangs-eaves-of-a-shed-coop-house.76599/

This is an invaluable tool for cutting both metal roofing and hardware cloth:
https://www.harborfreight.com/18-ga...-61737.html?_br_psugg_q=electric+metal+shears (Note: Yes, this is clunky and non-ergonomic, but the other one that fits the hand better takes a kerf out instead of making a single cut -- which would salt your run with tiny bits of metal that the chickens would surely eat.

I have 100 feet of Premier1 48" poultry netting, which I love but which has it's limitations -- including poor charging of the solar charger in the winter even at my latitude and, most critically, vulnerability to hawks (I lost 2 chicks this week). It's a trade-off for the flexibility.
 

Silexian

Songster
Jul 1, 2020
244
640
143
Northeast Missouri
I put metal roofs on all of my coops. I install 1/2 inch plywood to the rafters. Then cover the plywood with 30# tar paper. It keeps condensation from the metal off of the plywood. I like to use three rib metal on my roofs. I cut 2 inch foil backed insulation board to fit between the rafters inside the coop. I foil tape all the seams and edges. It keeps the radiant heat out in the summer and keep the chickens warmer in the winter. While also quieting the sound of heavy rain hitting the roof.
 

Shezadandy

Crowing
6 Years
Sep 26, 2015
2,545
3,438
407
Portland OR
I think if you design something that fits your needs and keeps your birds dry you’re good. Why does it matter which way the roof slopes? As long as it’s cool enough in summer and dry enough in winter it’s all good.

Roof overhang is definitely a good thing, good idea to add it. You can purchase those fiberglass wavy roof panel things at the big box stores, and depending on the size of your coop you might only need a couple. I’ve had those on the roof over plywood since the coop was built and they’re still there. No leaks either. I think they’re made of some other material now, but it works great and is more water proof than just paint. Less maintenance too I think. We have monsoons here with high winds and horizontal rain so they are pretty tough.

Depending on where you live and your geography, which way the roof slopes can be the difference between creating a swamp and potentially undermining the foundation of your building vs. having good drainage. For example, if you're on a hill like I am, if I slope my roof to the "uphill" area, the water from the roof will pool and run under the structure.

My coop was fine because of the built in drainage on the gravel pad and retaining wall ... and the chickens do not have access to underneath their coop -- but my shade/rain shelter in the run is NOT fine. I need to turn it the other way so the low edges run parallel to the hill (flip it 90 degrees). Though it is only 12x12, the water that comes off the uphill (side facing us) side ends up running under the shelter where I've drawn the red lines (and we get a lot of rain!). When turned 90 degrees, the water shedding off the shelter, with little help, will go down the hill without first dumping under the shelter, so the low edges of the shelter should be where the green lines are, with the water shed off the roof not going under the structure but instead down the hill We've since added a lot of drainage ditches and gravel to channel water AROUND the shelter from uphill, so once I flip the structure, things will be much better.

InkedP1280814_LI.jpg
 

igorsMistress

Frank and Abbys mom.
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Apr 9, 2013
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Depending on where you live and your geography, which way the roof slopes can be the difference between creating a swamp and potentially undermining the foundation of your building vs. having good drainage. For example, if you're on a hill like I am, if I slope my roof to the "uphill" area, the water from the roof will pool and run under the structure.

My coop was fine because of the built in drainage on the gravel pad and retaining wall ... and the chickens do not have access to underneath their coop -- but my shade/rain shelter in the run is NOT fine. I need to turn it the other way so the low edges run parallel to the hill (flip it 90 degrees). Though it is only 12x12, the water that comes off the uphill (side facing us) side ends up running under the shelter where I've drawn the red lines (and we get a lot of rain!). When turned 90 degrees, the water shedding off the shelter, with little help, will go down the hill without first dumping under the shelter, so the low edges of the shelter should be where the green lines are, with the water shed off the roof not going under the structure but instead down the hill We've since added a lot of drainage ditches and gravel to channel water AROUND the shelter from uphill, so once I flip the structure, things will be much better.

View attachment 2906034
Sorry, I assumed the OP was capable of realizing whether or not water runoff would impact their coop. Since they can build I figured there’s some common sense. Terrain can impact that, but geographic location? Doubt it.

My coop is fine without gravel at the base. It’s on a slight slope but it’s level because we put it on bricks. Nothing but deep litter for the inside.
 

Shezadandy

Crowing
6 Years
Sep 26, 2015
2,545
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407
Portland OR
Sorry, I assumed the OP was capable of realizing whether or not water runoff would impact their coop. Since they can build I figured there’s some common sense. Terrain can impact that, but geographic location? Doubt it.

My coop is fine without gravel at the base. It’s on a slight slope but it’s level because we put it on bricks. Nothing but deep litter for the inside.

Geographic location does matter. If I'm building in the desert I have different priorities in placement than if I'm building for months and months of rain and wind. Terrain matters too, so sorry to have offended your particular lexicon.

The OP is in a similar climate to mine. And expressed concern about planning for run-off. And is doing a shed-style roof meaning all the water will drop off one side.. And I shared my own stupid mistake and unintended consequences with illustration for others to learn from. Your comment asked why which way the roof sloped matters ... so I replied given the shed style roof - yes, it matters which way the roof slopes. It's easy to overlook things, which is why people come here and ask for advice.

What I was saying about gravel with drainage as a base was that though our A-frame coop roof is oriented the same direction as the run shelter, I get away with it there because of the gravel base/drainage. I only mentioned it because it's visible in the picture and is oriented the same way as the run shelter.
 

igorsMistress

Frank and Abbys mom.
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Apr 9, 2013
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Geographic location does matter. If I'm building in the desert I have different priorities in placement than if I'm building for months and months of rain and wind. Terrain matters too, so sorry to have offended your particular lexicon.

The OP is in a similar climate to mine. And expressed concern about planning for run-off. And is doing a shed-style roof meaning all the water will drop off one side.. And I shared my own stupid mistake and unintended consequences with illustration for others to learn from. Your comment asked why which way the roof sloped matters ... so I replied given the shed style roof - yes, it matters which way the roof slopes. It's easy to overlook things, which is why people come here and ask for advice.

What I was saying about gravel with drainage as a base was that though our A-frame coop roof is oriented the same direction as the run shelter, I get away with it there because of the gravel base/drainage. I only mentioned it because it's visible in the picture and is oriented the same way as the run shelter.
I said it didn’t matter if the roof sloped toward the back away from whatever the OP said it does. Your geographic location only matters really as far as temperature. I’ve lived places where it rains for two weeks straight and here where we have gulley washers that cause massive flooding. It doesn’t matter where I live, I still have a coop and it’s the same basic design. How we prep the area around it is the concern, as you’ve mentioned. Your soil conditions and weather patterns matter more than geographic location. It’s like a people house….they’re all over the country but the soil conditions determine prep.
 

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