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Mites or molt or overbreeding?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by quackydoodle, Sep 25, 2014.

  1. quackydoodle

    quackydoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is my "Colombian Wyandotte". She looks nothing like a colimbian, however, ha ha. She's less than a year old. She has a bald spot on her crop. She's acting and laying completely normal. She's not acting any itchier than any of my other hens. I don't know if that black spot is dirt in her follicle or what. She was kept with twice as many roosters as hens, so the other hens I got have bare backs. She's the only one with a bald front, though. Any ideas?

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    Last edited: Sep 25, 2014
  2. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    That is odd.. Is/was she broody? Have you checked her over for mites/skin irritations, etc?
     
  3. HumbleHen207

    HumbleHen207 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree, it is odd for them to only lose feathers on the front. It does seem to be regrowing, there are a lot of pin feathers there. Have the other birds been picking on her at all?
     
  4. FoxyChicken

    FoxyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I also have a hen with a bald crop, it was feather picking in my case. She's molting now so the feathers are growing back but she's been bald since spring. I would suggest putting some anti-pick spray on her. Those pin feathers are mighty tempting for feather pickers!
     
  5. quackydoodle

    quackydoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2014
    Rigby, ID
    To update- it was a molt that started at her crop, then her head, then spread like normal.
     

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