mixed breeds...Good layers?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by rssnbabybear, Oct 27, 2016.

  1. Yes. The chicks should continue to be good layers.

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  2. No. It is a gamble if the resulting "mixed" chicks would grow into good egg layers.

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  3. No. But, you can mix different colors of the same breed with chicks that will grow into good layers.

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  4. No. If you want chicks that will grow into good layers, you need to keep it to one variety.

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  1. rssnbabybear

    rssnbabybear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello all...I have a weird questions. Do mixed breeds of good laying breeds still make good layers? I had the ideal that I could buy a large variety of good egg layers and then keep a roo and continue my own flock with good egg laying and free chicks every year. But I have three that are this spring's chicks and I'm not sure that they are laying much if at all. Two are mixed Austrolorp and White Leghorn (or possibly Colombia rock). The other is either pure Austrolorp or a mix with a Black Sexlink.

    If I continue to let my Austrolorp Roo do his job with all my pretty ladies will I continue to get chicks that will turn into good layers or is it a gamble? (I have Buff Orpingtons, Brown and White Leghorns, Black sex links, Colombia Rocks, Barred Rocks and Austrolorps).

    And on that same note, if I need to narrow it down to one breed to have good layers AND free chicks that turn into good layers, can I mix different colors of the same breed? (ex. mixed colors of Wynodetts).
     
  2. chickencraz

    chickencraz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Breeding breeds that are good egg layers (which yours are), you should continue to produce good egg layers. All commercial sex-links are cross breeds.
    Crossing color shouldn't have any effect on how the birds lay as long as they come from good laying birds. However you would end up with interesting colored chickens.
     
  3. hje007

    hje007 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My pullets I hatched this spring have been great layers. The hens they came from were hatchery quality barred rocks their father was a production red/white rock cross. All of their brothers went to freezer camp at 15 weeks old and dressed out at 4-5 lbs. I got about 75% black sex linked chicks and 25% white chicks. The white chicks did have sex-linked barring, but it was hard to see at hatch. I will be repeating this cross again next spring.
     
  4. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    The chicks should all be as productive as the parents. However, an Australorp rooster will produce mostly black chicks, with little variation. You may find yourself tired of having so many black birds.
     
  5. chickens really

    chickens really Chicken Obsessed

    I love Mixed Breeds of all livestock....Mixed Chickens produce really well and you have a interesting flock....As long as your mixing what you like as layers?? It does not matter...If looking for egg production Birds then stick to production Birds...I love, old time farm Roosters and Hens....You know what you had....But what created that pretty Pullet or Cockerel?? I live that way.....


    Cheers!
     
  6. rssnbabybear

    rssnbabybear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Interesting colors were exactly what I was hoping for. I love chickens and the more colors I have the better. They are my eye candy. But I really need good layers since I sell the eggs to help with the cost of their feed.
     
  7. rssnbabybear

    rssnbabybear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't mind mostly black birds as long as there is some variety. Actually, the White leghorn or Colombia rock crossed hens are almost pure white with just a few black specks.
     
  8. chickens really

    chickens really Chicken Obsessed

    I bought these this year.....Make a pretty flock if you like heavy breeds??

    Anyways......Orpingtons- Blue, Buff and Splash....Orpington/Brahama, EEs, Danish Brown Leghorns, Speckled Sussex..Ameruacana.. One Bantam hen.My Rooster is a Brahma/Ameruacana....Big pretty boy...Docile...

    He is Very Pretty...[​IMG]
     
  9. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    White Leghorns are dominant white. Dominant white only affect black patterning. From your description, they only have a single copy, which will give you about 50% solid black and 50% solid white. The extended black pattern gene is dominant over just about all other pattern genes.
     
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  10. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I've done pretty much what you're describing---start with a variety of hatchery birds and let them mix and match for a few generations.

    Mine have all been pretty good layers. The crosses aren't going to give you something as good as a parent Leghorn or sex link, but they'll still be good layers.

    Your parent breeds are good production birds for the most part.If you're really looking for eggs, don't set the eggs from the Orpingtons or Colombian Rocks, they're probably your weakest link for laying hens overall. Flip side to that, they're probably your most likely to go broody, so they're great to have around.

    If you set only the barred Rock eggs, you'll get sex linked offspring. Males white head spot, females solid dark head.

    The Aussie/Leghorn cross should be great layers. And, the dominant white in the Leghorn will turn the black from the Aussie into white, giving you some variety.

    You can also hold back a Leghorn cross cockerel as a potential keeper for next year, or the year after that. That Leghorn blood will boost production in the offspring.
     

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