multiple bully hens! help!!

Sunny Chicks

Songster
6 Years
May 18, 2013
103
3
104
the past week or so, I've noticed one Hen after the next go after one of my buff orpingtons. all hens are the exact same age, different breeds, but have been together their whole life. in the past they peck eachother, but nothing to this extreme. they'll pin down the hen, Cleo, and one jumps on her back and the other five bullies come in and peck the heck out of her! They've left her bleeding some days. she's paranoid and hangs around me when I go out to visit. I have a dog crate all ready for seperatipn, but in this situation, who do I separate? instinct wise, I want to get Cleo out of there and safe, but once I wereto reintroduce her she would be at the bottom of the pecking order. Not all of the hens go after Cleo, the four leghorns, a buff, and one white ameracauna. I'm very worried for my Cle, as she's such a sweet girl. please help as soon as possible!
 

donrae

Hopelessly Addicted
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Jun 18, 2010
31,453
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Southern Oregon
If multiple birds go after one other bird, it's usually an indication there's something wrong with that bird. They're usually sensing a weakness of some sort that they instinctively want culled from the flock. I would pull her to be sure she's not sick in some way. Then, you may have to re-evaluate her future with your flock if she is healthy but simply not assertive enough to maintain a place with the other birds.
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
11 Years
Nov 12, 2009
8,847
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western South Dakota
I like a peaceful flock, so I agree with Donrae on this post too.

You don't mention the age of the flock, so if they are just now getting to full size, it could be over crowding in your set up. When chicks are small, they take up less space, but as they grow, they often outgrow the coop/run.

So you might measure the area you have and check that too.

Mrs K
 

Sunny Chicks

Songster
6 Years
May 18, 2013
103
3
104
If multiple birds go after one other bird, it's usually an indication there's something wrong with that bird. They're usually sensing a weakness of some sort that they instinctively want culled from the flock. I would pull her to be sure she's not sick in some way. Then, you may have to re-evaluate her future with your flock if she is healthy but simply not assertive enough to maintain a place with the other birds.

Nothing seems to be wrong with the hen. clear eyes and nostrils, normal breathing, she eats, drinks, and still lays eggs. I'm desperate on what to do. I have her separated during the day, I'll let them forage together but she goes off on her own, and roost with them at night. please help. that's for your response
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,192
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
Nothing seems to be wrong with the hen. clear eyes and nostrils, normal breathing, she eats, drinks, and still lays eggs. I'm desperate on what to do. I have her separated during the day, I'll let them forage together but she goes off on her own, and roost with them at night. please help. that's for your response

Watch your flock continuously at roosting time. If the hen you mentioned always is the last one to roost, in my opinion she needs a new home.
 

Sunny Chicks

Songster
6 Years
May 18, 2013
103
3
104
Watch your flock continuously at roosting time.  If the hen you mentioned always is the last one to roost, in my opinion she needs a new home.
They're turning 2 years old in a couple days. odd that there's a problem now. thank you for your help! I'll watch them roost this whole week then decide on what to do next.
 

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