My Chickens Crop won't empty and she is very thin

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by TerriL188, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. TerriL188

    TerriL188 Chirping

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    I noticed a few days ago that one of my girls would not perch at night but was sitting on the floor of the coop. I picked her up and noticed see was bone thin and her crop was big and squishy. I checked it the next morning and the crop had not emptied. I see her eating well and she runs around with the rest of the flock. I thought, before I saw her crop, that she had worms but after I saw her crop I just did not know. I didn't know that they got so thin with a crop problem but I guess it makes sense. I am thinking about trying to empty her crop like I have seen in some videos. I would appreciate any input before I put her through that. Thanks for any help. Terri
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    Unfortunately when I have seen a crop problem in my chickens, it has usually been a result of some other problem, such as internal laying, salpingitis, ascites, or cancer. It is risky to empty the crop, so make sure that you are doing it properly. Many experienced chicken owners have lost chickens who have aspirated during vomiting.

    It sounds like sour crop, and that is very difficult to treat since the crop problem has been going on awhile. The crop contents can smell almost like poo when they vomit, the longer it has been going on. Some use tomato juice, while others use Nystatin, or other antifungal creams or suppositories.

    Here are two articles by experienced people about treatments:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...w-to-know-which-one-youre-dealing-with.73607/

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...d-sour-crops-prevention-and-treatments.67194/
     
  3. meetthebubus

    meetthebubus Crowing

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    I copied this info from another post bc I thought it very informative I didn't write it I forget who did bc I copied it like a week ago or so it might of been @Eggcessive too


    CHICKEN - Crop DisordersDiagnosing the crop disorderA hen is behaving lethargically, not eating much, if at all, but she has a full crop. This is the first sign something's not right. The full crop points to this hen having crop issues and not being sick for some other reason such as a bacterial infection, which would result in loss of appetite and empty crop.

    Before you treat for a crop issue, though, you need to verify that your hen or roo actually has a crop issue and whether it's sour crop or impacted crop or both. So you need to monitor the crop overnight, checking the condition before bedtime, and first thing in the morning before your patient eats anything.

    Sour crop
    A crop that is still full in the morning has issues. So, is the issue sour crop? If the crop feels squishy and full of liquid, it's likely sour crop. If there's an odor coming from the head of the chicken that smell similar to sauerkraut, then you are probably dealing with sour crop. The cause is a yeast called Candida albicans.

    Impacted crop
    If the crop is extremely full and hard, or perhaps lumpy, and maybe feels like it's full of fibrous material, you are probably looking at impacted crop. If the chicken has been drinking lots of water, yet not eating anything, this is further indication of impacted crop.

    Impacted crop/sour crop
    If the crop is full and hard and lumpy and the chicken has been drinking lots of water and it smells like sauerkraut, you likely have an impacted crop that has developed a yeast infection. You will be treating the impacted crop first, followed by treatment for the yeast infection.

    Treatment for impacted crop
    I use coconut oil for the ease in administering it. When chilled, it is solid and easy to break into small chunks and slip into the beak of the patient without creating a huge mess or getting oil into the airway. You want to measure two teaspoons for an adult chicken and one teaspoon for a baby chick.

    After getting the oil into the patient, you want to massage the crop gently in a circular and slightly upwardmotion. This will direct the contents toward the crop "drain". Massage for five to ten minutes. If the crop refuses to empty, repeat the oil and massage again in 30 minutes. If the crop still refuses to empty, then give a stool softener such as Dulcolax (docusate sodium). Wait 30 minutes and massage the crop. The crop should empty. Add more oil if it doesn't and massage again. This should do it.

    Treatment for sour crop
    I advise against trying to make your chicken vomit because it may cause them to aspirate the sour liquid. Besides, it's very unpleasant for your hen, and she may hate you if you do it. (Curiously, most sour crop victims are hens.)

    Nystatin is the best treatment for yeast infections, but it requires a prescription. Or you can try to locate medistatin which is for birds and doesn't require a prescription.

    The easiest (and cheapest) to obtain yeast treatment, though, is miconazole, found on the women's hygiene shelf in the pharmacy. You can use either the suppositories or the vaginal cream. Measure a quarter inch of suppository or about half an inch of cream and give orally twice a day for seven days. Do not stop treatment before the full seven days are completed or the yeast may return.

    Following treatment for sour crop, offer plenty of plain fresh water and boiled egg to get the crop operating again. I like to also give a probiotic or Greek yogurt to restore good microbes in crop and intestines.

    Pendulous crop
    If you have treated for these crop issues and the crop still refuses to empty by morning, the hen may have a condition called pendulous crop. This is caused by poor muscle tone that causes the crop to sag and the contents are below the crop "drain" so the crop doesn't fully empty. The solution is a crop bra.
     
  4. TerriL188

    TerriL188 Chirping

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    Thank you both for your reply. That is great information and just what I needed. I do think I will not vomit her. I will check her to see if its sour crop which is what it sounds like and I will treat it accordingly. I will let you know how this turns out. Terri
     
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  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Crossing the Road

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    @meetthebubus here's a link to the article https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...w-to-know-which-one-youre-dealing-with.73607/
     
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  6. chickens really

    chickens really Crazy Call Duck Momma

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  7. TerriL188

    TerriL188 Chirping

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    I read the articles Thank you very much. I do have one question, should I remove her from her flock and bring her in the house or would she be happier with her friends?
    I thought since its cold outside she might be more comfortable in the house but more scared!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  8. chickens really

    chickens really Crazy Call Duck Momma

    Leave her because stress causes them to give up.
     
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  9. meetthebubus

    meetthebubus Crowing

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  10. Cragg Klefor

    Cragg Klefor Songster

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    I would actually separate her for this one... when it's a crop issue it really makes a difference what you allow her to eat. She will make it worse by picking things up off the ground. If it is possible for you to cage her in with her flock that would be ideal? It depends on what the exact crop issue is (which the article Wyorp Rock gave you will help you with) as to what you need to feed her, if anything at all. You may need to restrict her food, again depending on what the issue is. I'm normally against separating chickens from their flock mates unless they may have something contagious, but this is one of the other situations which warrants it.
     
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