My smallest hen is limping

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by szczur, Aug 25, 2016.

  1. szczur

    szczur Out Of The Brooder

    53
    9
    48
    Aug 30, 2015
    I have a 3.9 lb hen and and 8.2 lb roo. He tends to mate her the most because he can squish her, the other 5-7 lb hens aren't as cooperative. Can he give her a sprain? I checked her feet and there were no lesions, they were not swollen. Eyes weren't weird from Marek's and no one else has shown a sign. They will be a year old the first week of Sept. No hot areas. She seemed ok with me moving her "knee" but didn't like me moving her thigh on the foot that she doesn't want to stand on, so I guess that is what must hurt. The bones are not broken.
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    10,379
    3,845
    406
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    Yes, that could hurt her.

    Separate her - a kennel in the run, so she is still part of the flock is ideal.
    Add some poultry vitamins to her water, feed her her normal poultry feed and give some extra protein like egg, tuna, mackerel or meat.

    She most likely is sprained/strained, especially if he just jumps on her and doesn't wait for her to squat (squatting helps carry the load).
    It may take her a few weeks to get better. Keep an eye on her for any other signs of illness, but most likely it's just an injury.

    Let us know how she is doing.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. szczur

    szczur Out Of The Brooder

    53
    9
    48
    Aug 30, 2015
    Update: I separated her into the broody breaker cage within sight of her flock and she has gotten better. Sometimes she still limps but she's not doing the hobble. I let her back with the flock today....and the big rooster immediately flattened her without her squatting. [​IMG]She didn't re-injure, but unfortunately that's probably what caused her sprain. I have all-polish chicks I'm raising that I can attempt integration with though once I remove the young roos. I'd eat the big guy but he's actually very human friendly and doesn't squash the larger hens! Thanks for the advice!!!
     
  4. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    10,379
    3,845
    406
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    I'm glad that she is improving.

    It sounds like it may be time to make a new flock. The large Rooster will most likely squash your Polish as well, so you may want to put your small hen with them and create a hen only flock. He will most likely continue to mate her frequently since she is smaller and lower in pecking order. If you can't separate her at this time, place some perches or some things that she can get up on or under that he can't reach her. This may give her some relief, but removing her would be best since you don't want to get rid of him.

    Thanks for the update.
     
  5. szczur

    szczur Out Of The Brooder

    53
    9
    48
    Aug 30, 2015
    I figured as much. I doubt he will stop mating her so frequently, so she's back in the cage until the chicks are big enough she won't kill them, then I will stick her in a separate enclosure with them. Hopefully they will get along with little fuss...I'm thinking maybe I should remove another hen as her friend from the original flock as the chicks will probably gang up on her. Chicken management is hard. [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  6. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    10,379
    3,845
    406
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    It depends on your set up, but if you have room, place her cage next to the polish chicks brooder. This way they can see each other and become at least "familiar" with one another. When the chicks get old enough to integrate with her, there may be some posturing/pecking order, but hopefully if they have been around each other for a while it won't be a big issue.

    There are lots of great tips here on BYC and the internet.

    Here is an article with photos that may give you some ideas:

    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2011/06/integrating-new-flock-members-playpen.html
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by