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My son is working on a research paper....your input is wanted!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by WthrLady, Nov 23, 2015.

  1. Cocci

    6 vote(s)
    40.0%
  2. Mereks

    1 vote(s)
    6.7%
  3. Avian Flu

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Newcastles

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Mites/Ticks

    4 vote(s)
    26.7%
  6. Intestinal Worms

    6 vote(s)
    40.0%
  7. Respiratory Infections - colds etc

    3 vote(s)
    20.0%
  8. Flies - Fly strike infections

    2 vote(s)
    13.3%
  9. Fowl Pox

    1 vote(s)
    6.7%
  10. Other - please add your OTHER as a reply as well

    6 vote(s)
    40.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. WthrLady

    WthrLady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    With the insurgency of backyard and small flock chicken keeping, my son has decided to write a research paper on the most common diseases and pests (not predators) that flocks come up against. Could you please take a second to fill out this poll??? Thank you.
     
  2. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You need a none of the above.
     
  3. UrbanFarmOC

    UrbanFarmOC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd also add bumblefoot to the list.
     
  4. WthrLady

    WthrLady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We considered bumblefoot, but as it is infection due to micro injury to the foot we did not. But will gladly take it as other.
     
  5. UrbanFarmOC

    UrbanFarmOC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Southern California
    Ah I see. I suggested because my friend just spent the last 6 months dealing with a stubborn case of bumblefoot for one of her hens. It's a longer period than either of us had had to deal with for other illnesses or ailments
     
  6. WthrLady

    WthrLady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    WestOak, Nebraska
    Noted! Thank you!

    He's adding "secondary infection - due to accident or injury/predator attack". I am unable to edit the poll. But it is going in the paper.

    Also going in the paper, " people who choose to let nature take it's course and not worry about any of it"

    Thanks everyone! His teacher is super excited about this paper as she is planning on chickens for their family!

    Keep 'em coming'!!
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    In turkeys and peafowl the disease I deal with most is blackhead (hisomoniasis) and the E.coli that they almost always get with it.
    In chickens it's coccidiosis, Marek's, ascites, cancer and EYP.
    Ducks are pretty healthy, but every now and then I get one with a bacterial infection of the intestines.
    Pigeons - Canker

    I am one that does everything possible to save mine.

    -Kathy
     
  8. lovemy6hens

    lovemy6hens Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Nov 4, 2013
    Central Texas
    Other: Bumblefoot. The time involved per chicken, per foot, per day, over a period of potentially months to heal is unquestionably the largest amount of time I have spent treating my chickens for anything. Bumblefoot is preventable. This did not have to happen.

    Worming them doesn't take much time at all.
     
  9. bestnestbox

    bestnestbox Out Of The Brooder

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    respiratory illness would be first. and worms secondary.
     
  10. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Newcastle is almost never an issue.

    There are far more common problems in poultry. Kathy mentioned EYP as an issue. This one is HUGE. EYP accounts for more losses in 2ish year old hens than just about anything else other than predation. It is likely genetic in nature, and has not been bred out of lines used by the larger hatcheries in the US. This is a shame, but good for their business models because the affected birds have a limited life expectancy- they stop laying and die shortly thereafter. It is too bad because these birds do not die a good death. It is long, drawn out and painful for the birds as well as the keepers. I have shed more tears of sadness, anger and frustration over this issue than any other.
     
    1 person likes this.

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