Necropsy results for 11 week old chick

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by bamoram, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. bamoram

    bamoram In the Brooder

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    Sep 11, 2019
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    Thank you :hit
     
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  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    I would consider all your chickens to be carriers of mycoplasma synoviae (MS,) even though you may only see the one or a few others with symptoms. That is how the disease spreads to other flocks by carriers who are not showing symptoms. The signs of MS are usually swollen ankles and sometimes swollen hocks, and some may develop breast blisters or abscesses on the breast bone. There may be mild or no respiratory symptoms.

    I would recommend when your extra cockerels are old enough to be butchered, that you do that or give them to someone who could use them for the meat. Or you could go ahead and cull them. It is a shame that you couldn’t just keep the cockerels, but anyone who has had a bunch of maturing cockerels running wild, knows that it is best to separate them. Sorry that you are dealing with this chronic joint disease. For future reference, when ALL of your birds have been gone for several days to a couple of weeks, it would be safe to get new healthy chicks without fear of MS spreading. Mycoplasma is only alive for about 3 days when birds are gone.
     
  3. slordaz

    slordaz hatchaholic

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    you might want to let everyone you got chicks from know, seems how you said that you got them from various sources, someones flock has it and they shouldn't be letting chickens off their property either, would figure the one that died is where it came from , but I may be wrong
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019
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  4. bamoram

    bamoram In the Brooder

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    Sep 11, 2019
    Virginia
    I had another bird die at about 3-4 weeks that never gained weight. Didn't do a necropsy because the state vet said if it was failure to thrive it could give a lot of positives for things that the other birds may not even have. I'll message all of the "breeders" and let them know.
     
  5. bamoram

    bamoram In the Brooder

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    Sep 11, 2019
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    Are there symptoms that a bird displays that has an overload of e.coli?
     
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  6. bamoram

    bamoram In the Brooder

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    Sep 11, 2019
    Virginia
    These dude weigh just under 3 lbs. Never butchered a chicken before, no idea if that's even enough.
     
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  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    E.coli is an opportunistic bacteria, present in all chickens and in their droppings in the coop. When they get sick from an illness, then E.coli can become a secondary illness, even spreading through the whole body via the respiratory system.
     
  8. boskelli1571

    boskelli1571 Crowing

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    Once you have MS in the flock it's there to stay. All birds are contagious to others.
    If you decide to get more chickens you should keep them far away from your current flock if you want to breed them.
    I have MS in my flock too but they are pretty happy, lay eggs and do 'chickeny' things, problems can arise if they get another infection as the MS will rear it's ugly head again and you may have to resort to antibiotics.
    About those roosters - I strongly suspect no-one is going to want them, so your choice will be keep or cull.
    If you decide to keep them, they can live happily together in a separate coop away from the ladies :)
     
  9. bamoram

    bamoram In the Brooder

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    Sep 11, 2019
    Virginia
    I would keep them if I could. My county does not allow roosters. :(
     
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  10. bamoram

    bamoram In the Brooder

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    Sep 11, 2019
    Virginia
    Posted to the ID/sexing thread and realized one of the roosters has always had a much paler comb than the others and he seems like he's dropping his wings a bit today. I'm not sure if the comb color is abnormal for his age or not. And if it is signaling he is ill should what should I treat for? Cocci? IMG_20190912_080534.jpg
     
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