Need advice for re-settling a rooster.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by That_Chick, Jul 8, 2011.

  1. That_Chick

    That_Chick Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 12, 2011
    My pet rooster got killed a couple of weeks ago. He climbed into the dog yard. Anyway, I miss having a rooster around, so I checked on Craigslist and found a few roosters. I thought I would because a lot of those cute "Easter chicks" are turning into roosters now ;-) I found a lovely little rooster that is 17 weeks old, and has been handled by a bunch of little kids. He is very affectionate, easy to handle, and beautiful. So far so good. I have not re settled a chicken before, and wondered how soon it would be safe to let him wander with my chickens who are free in a 2-3 acre area. I don't want to have him trying to get home, and end up injured or worse.
    Thanks
     
  2. Pinky

    Pinky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Usually by two weeks my new chickens know where home is and where to go at night.
     
  3. That_Chick

    That_Chick Out Of The Brooder

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    I put this young guy in a dog crate in the barn. The other chickens will roost near where he is. They come and go freely during the day from the barn, and roost in the barn. The chickens all stay inside the area during the day. It is a fenced turn-out that is a couple of acres. They don't leave, but if they wanted to, they could get out, and I don't know if a new chicken would leave the area. If he knows where the food and water is, do you think it is safe to let him out with the other chickens tomorrow?
     
  4. That_Chick

    That_Chick Out Of The Brooder

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    I was hoping that with all of the post-Easter roosters that are bound to be out there, that people might have done this (re settled a rooster). Is there a list of basic information articles somewhere that I can check?
    Thanks
     
  5. 7&8

    7&8 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I bought a cockerel last winter and when I got him home, I put him right in with the hens in their enclosed run. I wasn't concerned about quarantining for health reasons as he was from a tested farm with healthy stock. I kept an eye on them, and he did chase them a bit at first. As far as his not sticking around, I had quite the opposite experience. Day three, and I left the gate open from the run so he could join the hen's for a little ranging. He wouldn't go out. It took him a long time before he would go with them, and when he did, he kept a short leash on them, bringing them back to their run well before they would have come on their own. (note: this was before the electric poultry netting) Chickens are flock animals - their flock consists of the birds they can see. I've never heard of one returning to their old home, unless it was next door or within hearing range of their old buddies.

    When you are certain your cockerel is healthy, I'd put him in with the girls after dark. Find an open space on the roost and make sure his feet are under him when you settle him down on the roost. They are very dopey at night. In the morning, it will be as if they've been together forever. I would do this when you know you can be around that next day after placing him in the coop at night to watch for any chicken drama. [​IMG]

    Good luck! [​IMG]
     
  6. That_Chick

    That_Chick Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks so much. I left him in the crate overnight, and this morning I let him out with the others. He seems to get along fine, and stayed with them all day. I have to go check at dusk and make sure he is roosting in a safe place. If so, I think I am pretty happy with this addition of a pretty rooster to my bunch. I appreciate the advice. I don't want to be over protective, but I also don't want to put my animals in danger unnecessarily.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

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    Too late to post this, but he should have been quarantined a minimum of 30 days before mixing with your birds. I'd put him back in quarantine and cross your fingers about your flock. By the time quarantine is done, he should be well "settled" enough to know where home is. Good luck. Post pics.
     
  8. That_Chick

    That_Chick Out Of The Brooder

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    what (diseases, disorders or parasites) would I be quaranteening him for?
     
  9. littlestars17

    littlestars17 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Honestly if hes already been in the same airspace/and freeranging with them today they will have already been exposed to anything he may or may not have..
     
  10. 7&8

    7&8 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Good question! I'm pretty sure everyone has their own approach to bringing new birds into their existing flocks.

    My perspective is based on this approach: I only get birds from reputable breeders/ poultry raisers. These folks show birds. In order to show a bird at an APA (American Poultry Assoc.) or ABA (American Bantam Assoc.) approved show, you must provide current certification that your flock has been tested for at least Salmonella Pullorum/Typhoid. For complete NPIP certification, birds are also tested for Mycoplasma Synoviae and Avian Influenza. So, I can be pretty sure that whatever I'm bringing home at least doesn't have these big strikes against it. Likewise, reputable breeders/ raisers likely do not have parasite infested birds in their flock. Although, they could be wormy or licey. I am armed with knowledge I've gained from reading poultry books; BYC discussions; and in the wee hours of the morning, esoteric PDF files published by universities and state agricultural organizations on Avian diseases. [​IMG] I am a member of a local, active Bird Fanciers Club. I go to meetings and I ask questions. There's a lot of knowledge in a good club. When I bring a bird home, I am not too concerned with quarantining it for thirty days. I am not a proponent of closed flocks, obviously. My birds are exposed to minor "stuff" at shows, I'm sure.

    But really, when you go to pick a bird up, look it over. Does it look healthy? Look around at the other birds. Do they appear healthy? Is the facility relatively clean? Ask questions of the owner. What health issues have they experienced in their flock, if any? Do they worm regularly? Treat for lice? Birds tested for Pullorum? Etc.

    Honestly, for a backyard flock, so long as you've made an effort to find out if the bird is healthy, and so long as it appears healthy, and so long as you feel good about where you're getting the bird from, I personally would'nt be too worried about quarantining. But that's just me. Others might feel strongly that a thirty day quarantine is essential. In this thirty days, you would learn if your bird is host to internal/ external parasites or carrying one or more of the multitudinous, nefarious diseases that chickens can carry.



    Use your good, common sense. [​IMG] Enjoy your new big guy! [​IMG]
     

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