Need advice for turkey's foot

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dreamyj, May 18, 2017.

  1. dreamyj

    dreamyj Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 1, 2015
    Shelby Ohio
    My bronzeTom Clyde has something wrong with his feet. They are both swollen very big, one worse than the other. I am not sure if it is bumblefoot. Due to his size and him being uncooperative, I have not been able to examine it closely. A couple of days ago, I tried to do an Epsom salt soak but only managed to soak myself and traumatize him! He is almost 1 yrs old and weighs at least 30 lbs. I injected him with 2 cc la200 for 3 days. The 4th day I thought I would try injectin directly into the foot but when I inserted the needle it just started running blood.

    If anyone can give me any tips or advice how to handle this problem, my big guy and I would be most appreciative. And also, I believe him to be heritage bronze not bb. I have seen him mate his girl Bonnie more than once. Can someone confirm this by his picture?

    He is still walking around and eating fine. His feet look horrible to me and I would assume painful to him. I have done bumblefoot surgery on a hen before, but am very reluctant about a turkey. Any advice?[GALLERY=][GALLERY=][GALLERY=] 20170514_114612.jpg 20170514_114550.jpg 20170514_114559.jpg [/GALLERY][/GALLERY][/GALLERY]
     

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  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Are you seeing any sores on the bottom of the turkey's foot pads? A swollen ankle can be from bumblefoot or a bacteria that has infected the joint, but it also can be a sign of mycoplasma synoviae (MS,) or viral arthritis if you are not seeing bumble foot signs. You might want to check with your regular vet about using a good broad spectrum antibiotic that might treat different bacteria, such as E.coli and MS. Here is some reading:
    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/poultry/mycoplasmosis/mycoplasma-synoviae-infection-in-poultry
    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/poult...stem/infectious-skeletal-disorders-in-poultry
     
  3. dreamyj

    dreamyj Out Of The Brooder

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    As I recently spent close to a thousand dollars taking my hen to a vet (she still died), unfortuately seeing a vet for the turkey is not possible. I have several antibiotics on hand. Would tylan or baytril be a good choice?

    And like I said, I have been unable to get a good look at the foot to see if it is bumblefoot. He is very strong and not letting me lift his foot to look. Perhaps I can get dh to assist.

    Thank you for your reply. I read the links you posted but they are over my head in terminology.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Baytril is probably the best one for treating an unkown infection, since it treats both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Tylan is better for respiratory diseases, but would treat MS in joints. Mycoplasma (MS) is gram positive where E.coli is gram negative, so I would go with the Baytril. It is banned for use in laying or meat birds in the US, but is used still by many vets and others in other countries.
     
  5. dreamyj

    dreamyj Out Of The Brooder

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    Shelby Ohio
    Thank you so much for your help. I just injected him with baytril. I also rubbed organic castor oil over his feet and legs. I had read an older post here where it was recommended. Unfortunately I haven't yet figured out a solution to how to soak his feet yet. Any ideas how one goes about that with such a big turkey?
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I haven't had turkeys, but I would imagine they could be very strong and uncooperative. With my chickens, if I have to do something that involves handling them, I take them off their roost at night using a headlamp with a red light. Depending on the size, you could use a tub or a garbage can with warm soapy water. But if you are not seeing a dark spot or sore on the footpads or between toes, then I would not soak the feet or risk being hurt.
     

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